Publications

2016
Zhang SH, Tse ZTH, Dumoulin CL, Kwong RY, Stevenson WG, Watkins R, Ward J, Wang W, Schmidt EJ. Gradient-induced Voltages on 12-lead ECGs during High Duty-cycle MRI Sequences and a Method for their Removal Considering Linear and Concomitant Gradient Terms. Magn Reson Med. 2016;75 (5) :2204-16.Abstract

PURPOSE: To restore 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) signal fidelity inside MRI by removing magnetic field gradient-induced voltages during high gradient duty cycle sequences. THEORY AND METHODS: A theoretical equation was derived to provide first- and second-order electrical fields induced at individual ECG electrodes as a function of gradient fields. Experiments were performed at 3T on healthy volunteers using a customized acquisition system that captured the full amplitude and frequency response of ECGs, or a commercial recording system. The 19 equation coefficients were derived via linear regression of data from accelerated sequences and were used to compute induced voltages in real-time during full resolution sequences to remove ECG artifacts. Restored traces were evaluated relative to ones acquired without imaging. RESULTS: Measured induced voltages were 0.7 V peak-to-peak during balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) with the heart at the isocenter. Applying the equation during gradient echo sequencing, three-dimensional fast spin echo, and multislice bSSFP imaging restored nonsaturated traces and second-order concomitant terms showed larger contributions in electrodes further from the magnet isocenter. Equation coefficients are evaluated with high repeatability (ρ = 0.996) and are dependent on subject, sequence, and slice orientation. CONCLUSION: Close agreement between theoretical and measured gradient-induced voltages allowed for real-time removal. Prospective estimation of sequence periods in which large induced voltages occur may allow hardware removal of these signals. Magn Reson Med 75:2204-2216, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Mitsouras D, Mulkern RV, Maier SE. Multicomponent T2 Relaxation Studies of the Avian Egg. Magn Reson Med. 2016;75 (5) :2156-64.Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the tissue-like multiexponential T2 signal decays in avian eggs. METHODS: Transverse relaxation studies of raw, soft-boiled and hard-boiled eggs were performed at 3 Tesla using a three-dimensional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill imaging sequence. Signal decays over a TE range of 11 to 354 ms were fitted assuming single- and multicomponent signal decays with up to three separately decaying components. Fat saturation was used to facilitate spectral assignment of observed decay components. RESULTS: Egg white, yolk and the centrally located latebra all demonstrate nonmonoexponential T2 decays. Specifically, egg white exhibits two-component decays with intermediate and long T2 times. Meanwhile, yolk and latebra are generally best characterized with triexponential decays, with short, intermediate and very long T2 decay times. Fat saturation revealed that the intermediate component of yolk could be attributed to lipids. Cooking of the egg profoundly altered the decay curves. CONCLUSION: Avian egg T2 decay curves cover a wide range of decay times. Observed T2 components in yolk and latebra as short as 10 ms, may prove valuable for testing clinical sequences designed to measure short T2 components, such as myelin-associated water in the brain. Thus we propose that the egg can be a versatile and widely available MR transverse relaxation phantom. Magn Reson Med 75:2156-2164, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Fischer DB, Perez DL, Prasad S, Rigolo L, O'Donnell L, Acar D, Meadows M-E, Baslet G, Boes AD, Golby AJ, et al. Right Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus Lesions Disrupt Visual-emotional Integration. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2016.Abstract

The mechanism by which the brain integrates visual and emotional information remains incompletely understood, and can be studied through focal lesions that selectively disrupt this process. To date, three reported cases of visual hypoemotionality, a vision-specific form of derealization, have resulted from lesions of the temporo-occipital junction. We present a fourth case of this rare phenomenon, and investigate the role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) in the underlying pathophysiology. A 50-year-old right-handed male was found to have a right medial temporal lobe tumor following new-onset seizures. Interstitial laser ablation of the lesion was complicated by a right temporo-parieto-occipital intraparenchymal hemorrhage. The patient subsequently experienced emotional estrangement from visual stimuli. A lesion overlap analysis was conducted to assess involvement of the ILF by this patient's lesion and those of the three previously described cases, and diffusion tensor imaging was acquired in our case to further investigate ILF disruption. All four lesions specifically overlapped with the expected trajectory of the right ILF, and diminished structural integrity of the right ILF was observed in our case. These findings implicate the ILF in visual hypoemotionality, suggesting that the ILF is critical for integrating visual information with its emotional content.

Ciris PA, Cheng C-C, Mei C-S, Panych LP, Madore B. Dual-Pathway Sequences for MR Thermometry: When and Where to use Them. Magn Reson Med. 2016.Abstract

PURPOSE: Dual-pathway sequences have been proposed to help improve the temperature-to-noise ratio (TNR) in MR thermometry. The present work establishes how much of an improvement these so-called "PSIF-FISP" sequences may bring in various organs and tissues. METHODS: Simulations and TNR calculations were validated against analytical equations, phantom, abdomen, and brain scans. Relative TNRs for PSIF-FISP, as compared to a dual-FISP reference standard, were calculated for flip angle (FA) = 1 to 85 º and repetition time (TR) = 6 to 60 ms, for gray matter, white matter, cervix, endometrium, myometrium, prostate, kidney medulla and cortex, bone marrow, pancreas, spleen, muscle, and liver tissues. RESULTS: PSIF-FISP was TNR superior in the kidney, pelvis, spleen, or gray matter at most tested TR and FA settings, and benefits increased at shorter TRs. PSIF-FISP was TNR superior in other tissues, e.g., liver, muscle, pancreas, for only short TR settings (20 ms or less). The TNR benefits of PSIF-FISP increased slightly with FA, and strongly with decreasing TR. Up to two- to three-fold reductions in TR with 20% TNR gains were achievable. In any given tissue, TNR performance is expected to further improve with heating, due to changes in relaxation rates. CONCLUSION: Dual-pathway PSIF-FISP can improve TNR and acquisition speed over standard gradient-recalled echo sequences, but optimal acquisition parameters are tissue dependent. Magn Reson Med 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Incekara F, Olubiyi O, Ozdemir A, Lee T, Rigolo L, Golby A. The Value of Pre- and Intraoperative Adjuncts on the Extent of Resection of Hemispheric Low-Grade Gliomas: A Retrospective Analysis. J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2016;77 (2) :79-87.Abstract
Background To achieve maximal resection with minimal risk of postoperative neurologic morbidity, different neurosurgical adjuncts are being used during low-grade glioma (LGG) surgery. Objectives To investigate the effect of pre- and intraoperative adjuncts on the extent of resection (EOR) of hemispheric LGGs. Methods Medical records were reviewed to identify patients of any sex, ≥ 18 years of age, who underwent LGG surgery at X Hospital between January 2005 and July 2013. Patients were divided into eight subgroups based on the use of various combinations of a neuronavigation system alone (NN), functional MRI-diffusion tensor imaging (fMRI-DTI) guided neuronavigation (FD), intraoperative MRI (MR), and direct electrical stimulation (DES). Initial and residual tumors were measured, and mean EOR was compared between groups. Results Of all 128 patients, gross total resection was achieved in 23.4%. Overall mean EOR was 81.3% ± 20.5%. Using DES in combination with fMRI-DTI (mean EOR: 86.7% ± 12.4%) on eloquent tumors improved mean EOR significantly after adjustment for potential confounders when compared with NN alone (mean EOR: 76.4% ± 25.5%; p = 0.001). Conclusions Using DES in combination with fMRI and DTI significantly improves EOR when LGGs are located in eloquent areas compared with craniotomies in which only NN was used.
Valdés PA, Roberts DW, Lu F-K, Golby A. Optical Technologies for Intraoperative Neurosurgical Guidance. Neurosurg Focus. 2016;40 (3) :E8.Abstract

Biomedical optics is a broadly interdisciplinary field at the interface of optical engineering, biophysics, computer science, medicine, biology, and chemistry, helping us understand light-tissue interactions to create applications with diagnostic and therapeutic value in medicine. Implementation of biomedical optics tools and principles has had a notable scientific and clinical resurgence in recent years in the neurosurgical community. This is in great part due to work in fluorescence-guided surgery of brain tumors leading to reports of significant improvement in maximizing the rates of gross-total resection. Multiple additional optical technologies have been implemented clinically, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and imaging, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and advanced quantitative methods, including quantitative fluorescence and lifetime imaging. Here we present a clinically relevant and technologically informed overview and discussion of some of the major clinical implementations of optical technologies as intraoperative guidance tools in neurosurgery.

Chen Z, Tie Y, Olubiyi O, Zhang F, Mehrtash A, Rigolo L, Kahali P, Norton I, Pasternak O, Rathi Y, et al. Corticospinal Tract Modeling for Neurosurgical Planning by Tracking through Regions of Peritumoral Edema and Crossing Fibers using Two-tensor Unscented Kalman Filter Tractography. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2016.Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to present a tractography algorithm using a two-tensor unscented Kalman filter (UKF) to improve the modeling of the corticospinal tract (CST) by tracking through regions of peritumoral edema and crossing fibers. METHODS: Ten patients with brain tumors in the vicinity of motor cortex and evidence of significant peritumoral edema were retrospectively selected for the study. All patients underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including functional MRI (fMRI) and a diffusion-weighted data set with 31 directions. Fiber tracking was performed using both single-tensor streamline and two-tensor UKF tractography methods. A two-region-of-interest approach was used to delineate the CST. Results from the two tractography methods were compared visually and quantitatively. fMRI was applied to identify the functional fiber tracts. RESULTS: Single-tensor streamline tractography underestimated the extent of tracts running through the edematous areas and could only track the medial projections of the CST. In contrast, two-tensor UKF tractography tracked fanning projections of the CST despite peritumoral edema and crossing fibers. Based on visual inspection, the two-tensor UKF tractography delineated tracts that were closer to motor fMRI activations, and it was apparently more sensitive than single-tensor streamline tractography to define the tracts directed to the motor sites. The volume of the CST was significantly larger on two-tensor UKF than on single-tensor streamline tractography ([Formula: see text]). CONCLUSION: Two-tensor UKF tractography tracks a larger volume CST than single-tensor streamline tractography in the setting of peritumoral edema and crossing fibers in brain tumor patients.

Mehrtash A, Gupta SN, Shanbhag D, Miller JV, Kapur T, Fennessy FM, Kikinis R, Fedorov A. Bolus Arrival Time and its Effect on Tissue Characterization with Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging. J Med Imaging (Bellingham). 2016;3 (1) :014503.Abstract

Matching the bolus arrival time (BAT) of the arterial input function (AIF) and tissue residue function (TRF) is necessary for accurate pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). We investigated the sensitivity of volume transfer constant ([Formula: see text]) and extravascular extracellular volume fraction ([Formula: see text]) to BAT and compared the results of four automatic BAT measurement methods in characterization of prostate and breast cancers. Variation in delay between AIF and TRF resulted in a monotonous change trend of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values. The results of automatic BAT estimators for clinical data were all comparable except for one BAT estimation method. Our results indicate that inaccuracies in BAT measurement can lead to variability among DCE-MRI PK model parameters, diminish the quality of model fit, and produce fewer valid voxels in a region of interest. Although the selection of the BAT method did not affect the direction of change in the treatment assessment cohort, we suggest that BAT measurement methods must be used consistently in the course of longitudinal studies to control measurement variability.

Weinreb JC, Barentsz JO, Choyke PL, Cornud F, Haider MA, Macura KJ, Margolis D, Schnall MD, Shtern F, Tempany CM, et al. PI-RADS Prostate Imaging - Reporting and Data System: 2015, Version 2. Eur Urol. 2016;69 (1) :16-40.Abstract
The Prostate Imaging - Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS™ v2) is the product of an international collaboration of the American College of Radiology (ACR), European Society of Uroradiology (ESUR), and AdMetech Foundation. It is designed to promote global standardization and diminish variation in the acquisition, interpretation, and reporting of prostate multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) examination, and it is based on the best available evidence and expert consensus opinion. It establishes minimum acceptable technical parameters for prostate mpMRI, simplifies and standardizes terminology and content of reports, and provides assessment categories that summarize levels of suspicion or risk of clinically significant prostate cancer that can be used to assist selection of patients for biopsies and management. It is intended to be used in routine clinical practice and also to facilitate data collection and outcome monitoring for research.
Geddes MR, Tie Y, Gabrieli JDE, McGinnis SM, Golby AJ, Whitfield-Gabrieli S. Altered Functional Connectivity in Lesional Peduncular Hallucinosis with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Cortex. 2016;74 :96-106.Abstract

Brainstem lesions causing peduncular hallucinosis (PH) produce vivid visual hallucinations occasionally accompanied by sleep disorders. Overlapping brainstem regions modulate visual pathways and REM sleep functions via gating of thalamocortical networks. A 66-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation developed abrupt-onset complex visual hallucinations with preserved insight and violent dream enactment behavior. Brain MRI showed restricted diffusion in the left rostrodorsal pons suggestive of an acute ischemic stroke. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was diagnosed on polysomnography. We investigated the integrity of ponto-geniculate-occipital circuits with seed-based resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) in this patient compared to 46 controls. Rs-fcMRI revealed significantly reduced functional connectivity between the lesion and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN), and between LGN and visual association cortex compared to controls. Conversely, functional connectivity between brainstem and visual association cortex, and between visual association cortex and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was significantly increased in the patient. Focal damage to the rostrodorsal pons is sufficient to cause RBD and PH in humans, suggesting an overlapping mechanism in both syndromes. This lesion produced a pattern of altered functional connectivity consistent with disrupted visual cortex connectivity via de-afferentation of thalamocortical pathways.

McDannold N, Zhang Y, Vykhodtseva N. Nonthermal Ablation in the Rat Brain using Focused Ultrasound and an Ultrasound Contrast Agent: Long-term Effects. J Neurosurg. 2016 :1-10.Abstract

OBJECTIVE Thermal ablation with transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) is currently under investigation as a less invasive alternative to radiosurgery and resection. A major limitation of the method is that its use is currently restricted to centrally located brain targets. The combination of FUS and a microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agent greatly reduces the ultrasound exposure level needed to ablate brain tissue and could be an effective means to increase the "treatment envelope" for FUS in the brain. This method, however, ablates tissue through a different mechanism: destruction of the microvasculature. It is not known whether nonthermal FUS ablation in substantial volumes of tissue can safely be performed without unexpected effects. The authors investigated this question by ablating volumes in the brains of normal rats. METHODS Overlapping sonications were performed in rats (n = 15) to ablate a volume in 1 hemisphere per animal. The sonications (10-msec bursts at 1 Hz for 60 seconds; peak negative pressure 0.8 MPa) were combined with the ultrasound contrast agent Optison (100 µl/kg). The rats were followed with MRI for 4-9 weeks after FUS, and the brains were examined with histological methods. RESULTS Two weeks after sonication and later, the lesions appeared as cyst-like areas in T2-weighted MR images that were stable over time. Histological examination demonstrated well-defined lesions consisting of a cyst-like cavity that remained lined by astrocytic tissue. Some white matter structures within the sonicated area were partially intact. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study indicate that nonthermal FUS ablation can be used to safely ablate tissue volumes in the brain without unexpected delayed effects. The findings are encouraging for the use of this ablation method in the brain.

Cheng C-C, Mei C-S, Duryea J, Chung H-W, Chao T-C, Panych LP, Madore B. Dual-pathway Multi-echo Sequence for Simultaneous Frequency and T2 Mapping. J Magn Reson. 2016;265 :177-187.Abstract

PURPOSE: To present a dual-pathway multi-echo steady state sequence and reconstruction algorithm to capture T2, T2(∗) and field map information. METHODS: Typically, pulse sequences based on spin echoes are needed for T2 mapping while gradient echoes are needed for field mapping, making it difficult to jointly acquire both types of information. A dual-pathway multi-echo pulse sequence is employed here to generate T2 and field maps from the same acquired data. The approach might be used, for example, to obtain both thermometry and tissue damage information during thermal therapies, or susceptibility and T2 information from a same head scan, or to generate bonus T2 maps during a knee scan. RESULTS: Quantitative T2, T2(∗) and field maps were generated in gel phantoms, ex vivo bovine muscle, and twelve volunteers. T2 results were validated against a spin-echo reference standard: A linear regression based on ROI analysis in phantoms provided close agreement (slope/R(2)=0.99/0.998). A pixel-wise in vivo Bland-Altman analysis of R2=1/T2 showed a bias of 0.034Hz (about 0.3%), as averaged over four volunteers. Ex vivo results, with and without motion, suggested that tissue damage detection based on T2 rather than temperature-dose measurements might prove more robust to motion. CONCLUSION: T2, T2(∗) and field maps were obtained simultaneously, from the same datasets, in thermometry, susceptibility-weighted imaging and knee-imaging contexts.

Ahmadi E, Katnani HA, Daftari Besheli L, Gu Q, Atefi R, Villeneuve MY, Eskandar E, Lev MH, Golby AJ, Gupta R, et al. An Electrocorticography Grid with Conductive Nanoparticles in a Polymer Thick Film on an Organic Substrate Improves CT and MR Imaging. Radiology. 2016 :142529.Abstract
Purpose To develop an electrocorticography (ECoG) grid by using deposition of conductive nanoparticles in a polymer thick film on an organic substrate (PTFOS) that induces minimal, if any, artifacts on computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images and is safe in terms of tissue reactivity and MR heating. Materials and Methods All procedures were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee and complied with the Public Health Services Guide for the Care and Use of Animals. Electrical functioning of PTFOS for cortical recording and stimulation was tested in two mice. PTFOS disks were implanted in two mice; after 30 days, the tissues surrounding the implants were harvested, and tissue injury was studied by using immunostaining. Five neurosurgeons rated mechanical properties of PTFOS compared with conventional grids by using a three-level Likert scale. Temperature increases during 30 minutes of 3-T MR imaging were measured in a head phantom with no grid, a conventional grid, and a PTFOS grid. Two neuroradiologists rated artifacts on CT and MR images of a cadaveric head specimen with no grid, a conventional grid, and a PTFOS grid by using a four-level Likert scale, and the mean ratings were compared between grids. Results Oscillatory local field potentials were captured with cortical recordings. Cortical stimulations in motor cortex elicited muscle contractions. PTFOS implants caused no adverse tissue reaction. Mechanical properties were rated superior to conventional grids (χ(2) test, P < .05). The temperature increase during MR imaging for the three cases of no grid, PTFOS grid, and conventional grid was 3.84°C, 4.05°C, and 10.13°C, respectively. PTFOS induced no appreciable artifacts on CT and MR images, and PTFOS image quality was rated significantly higher than that with conventional grids (two-tailed t test, P < .05). Conclusion PTFOS grids may be an attractive alternative to conventional ECoG grids with regard to mechanical properties, 3-T MR heating profile, and CT and MR imaging artifacts. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.
Westin C-F, Knutsson H, Pasternak O, Szczepankiewicz F, Özarslan E, van Westen D, Mattisson C, Bogren M, O'Donnell L, Kubicki M, et al. Q-space Trajectory Imaging for Multidimensional Diffusion MRI of the Human Brain. Neuroimage. 2016.Abstract

This work describes a new diffusion MR framework for imaging and modeling of microstructure that we call q-space trajectory imaging (QTI). The QTI framework consists of two parts: encoding and modeling. First we propose q-space trajectory encoding, which uses time-varying gradients to probe a trajectory in q-space, in contrast to traditional pulsed field gradient sequences that attempt to probe a point in q-space. Then we propose a microstructure model, the diffusion tensor distribution (DTD) model, which takes advantage of additional information provided by QTI to estimate a distributional model over diffusion tensors. We show that the QTI framework enables microstructure modeling that is not possible with the traditional pulsed gradient encoding as introduced by Stejskal and Tanner. In our analysis of QTI, we find that the well-known scalar b-value naturally extends to a tensor-valued entity, i.e., a diffusion measurement tensor, which we call the b-tensor. We show that b-tensors of rank 2 or 3 enable estimation of the mean and covariance of the DTD model in terms of a second order tensor (the diffusion tensor) and a fourth order tensor. The QTI framework has been designed to improve discrimination of the sizes, shapes, and orientations of diffusion microenvironments within tissue. We derive rotationally invariant scalar quantities describing intuitive microstructural features including size, shape, and orientation coherence measures. To demonstrate the feasibility of QTI on a clinical scanner, we performed a small pilot study comparing a group of five healthy controls with five patients with schizophrenia. The parameter maps derived from QTI were compared between the groups, and 9 out of the 14 parameters investigated showed differences between groups. The ability to measure and model the distribution of diffusion tensors, rather than a quantity that has already been averaged within a voxel, has the potential to provide a powerful paradigm for the study of complex tissue architecture.

Chao T-C, Chiou J-yuan G, Maier SE, Madore B. Fast Diffusion Imaging with High Angular Resolution. Magn Reson Med. 2016.Abstract

PURPOSE: High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is a well-established method to help reveal the architecture of nerve bundles, but long scan times and geometric distortions inherent to echo planar imaging (EPI) have limited its integration into clinical protocols. METHODS: A fast imaging method is proposed here that combines accelerated multishot diffusion imaging (AMDI), multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE), and crossing fiber angular resolution of intravoxel structure (CFARI) to reduce spatial distortions and reduce total scan time. A multishot EPI sequence was used to improve geometrical fidelity as compared to a single-shot EPI acquisition, and acceleration in both k-space and diffusion sampling enabled reductions in scan time. The method is regularized and self-navigated for motion correction. Seven volunteers were scanned in this study, including four with volumetric whole brain acquisitions. RESULTS: The average similarity of microstructural orientations between undersampled datasets and their fully sampled counterparts was above 85%, with scan times below 5 min for whole-brain acquisitions. Up to 2.7-fold scan time acceleration along with four-fold distortion reduction was achieved. CONCLUSION: The proposed imaging strategy can generate HARDI results with relatively good geometrical fidelity and low scan duration, which may help facilitate the transition of HARDI from a successful research tool to a practical clinical one. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Torcuator RG, Hulou MM, Chavakula V, Jolesz FA, Golby AJ. Intraoperative real-time MRI-guided stereotactic biopsy followed by laser thermal ablation for progressive brain metastases after radiosurgery. J Clin Neurosci. 2016;24 :68-73.Abstract
Stereotactic radiosurgery is one of the treatment options for brain metastases. However, there are patients who will progress after radiosurgery. One of the potential treatments for this subset of patients is laser ablation. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy is important to determine the histopathological nature of the lesion. However, this is usually based on preoperative, static images, which may affect the target accuracy during the actual procedure as a result of brain shift. We therefore performed real-time intraoperative MRI-guided stereotactic aspiration and biopsies on two patients with symptomatic, progressive lesions after radiosurgery followed immediately by laser ablation. The patients tolerated the procedure well with no new neurologic deficits. Intraoperative MRI-guided stereotactic biopsy followed by laser ablation is safe and accurate, providing real-time updates and feedback during the procedure.
Pujol S, Baldwin M, Nassiri J, Kikinis R, Shaffer K. Using 3D Modeling Techniques to Enhance Teaching of Difficult Anatomical Concepts. Acad Radiol. 2016;23 (4) :507-16.Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Anatomy is an essential component of medical education as it is critical for the accurate diagnosis in organs and human systems. The mental representation of the shape and organization of different anatomical structures is a crucial step in the learning process. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of developing innovative teaching modules for anatomy education of first-year medical students based on three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from actual patient data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 196 models of anatomical structures from 16 anonymized computed tomography datasets were generated using the 3D Slicer open-source software platform. The models focused on three anatomical areas: the mediastinum, the upper abdomen, and the pelvis. Online optional quizzes were offered to first-year medical students to assess their comprehension in the areas of interest. Specific tasks were designed for students to complete using the 3D models. RESULTS: Scores of the quizzes confirmed a lack of understanding of 3D spatial relationships of anatomical structures despite standard instruction including dissection. Written task material and qualitative review by students suggested that interaction with 3D models led to a better understanding of the shape and spatial relationships among structures, and helped illustrate anatomical variations from one body to another. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates the feasibility of one possible approach to the generation of 3D models of the anatomy from actual patient data. The educational materials developed have the potential to supplement the teaching of complex anatomical regions and help demonstrate the anatomical variation among patients.
2015
Tie Y, Rigolo L, Ozdemir Ovalioglu A, Olubiyi O, Doolin KL, Mukundan S, Golby AJ. A New Paradigm for Individual Subject Language Mapping: Movie-Watching fMRI. J Neuroimaging. 2015;25 (5) :710-20.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Functional MRI (fMRI) based on language tasks has been used in presurgical language mapping in patients with lesions in or near putative language areas. However, if patients have difficulty performing the tasks due to neurological deficits, it leads to unreliable or noninterpretable results. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using a movie-watching fMRI for language mapping. METHODS: A 7-minute movie clip with contrasting speech and nonspeech segments was shown to 22 right-handed healthy subjects. Based on all subjects' language functional regions-of-interest, 6 language response areas were defined, within which a language response model (LRM) was derived by extracting the main temporal activation profile. Using a leave-one-out procedure, individuals' language areas were identified as the areas that expressed highly correlated temporal responses with the LRM derived from an independent group of subjects. RESULTS: Compared with an antonym generation task-based fMRI, the movie-watching fMRI generated language maps with more localized activations in the left frontal language area, larger activations in the left temporoparietal language area, and significant activations in their right-hemisphere homologues. Results of 2 brain tumor patients' movie-watching fMRI using the LRM derived from the healthy subjects indicated its ability to map putative language areas; while their task-based fMRI maps were less robust and noisier. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that it is feasible to use this novel "task-free" paradigm as a complementary tool for fMRI language mapping when patients cannot perform the tasks. Its deployment in more neurosurgical patients and validation against gold-standard techniques need further investigation.

Garlapati RR, Mostayed A, Joldes GR, Wittek A, Doyle B, Miller K. Towards Measuring Neuroimage Misalignment. Comput Biol Med. 2015;64 :12-23.Abstract

To enhance neuro-navigation, high quality pre-operative images must be registered onto intra-operative configuration of the brain. Therefore evaluation of the degree to which structures may remain misaligned after registration is critically important. We consider two Hausdorff Distance (HD)-based evaluation approaches: the edge-based HD (EBHD) metric and the Robust HD (RHD) metric as well as various commonly used intensity-based similarity metrics such as Mutual Information (MI), Normalised Mutual Information (NMI), Entropy Correlation Coefficient (ECC), Kullback-Leibler Distance (KLD) and Correlation Ratio (CR). We conducted the evaluation by applying known deformations to simple sample images and real cases of brain shift. We conclude that the intensity-based similarity metrics such as MI, NMI, ECC, KLD and CR do not correlate well with actual alignment errors, and hence are not useful for assessing misalignment. On the contrary, the EBHD and the RHD metrics correlated well with actual alignment errors; however, they have been found to underestimate the actual misalignment. We also note that it is beneficial to present HD results as a percentile-HD curve rather than a single number such as the 95-percentile HD. Percentile-HD curves present the full range of alignment errors and also facilitate the comparison of results obtained using different approaches. Furthermore, the qualities that should be possessed by an ideal evaluation metric were highlighted. Future studies could focus on developing such an evaluation metric.

Chikarmane SA, Gombos EC, Jagadeesan J, Raut C, Jagannathan JP. MRI Findings of Radiation-associated Angiosarcoma of the Breast (RAS). J Magn Reson Imaging. 2015;42 (3) :763-70.Abstract

PURPOSE: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of radiation-associated breast angiosarcomas (RAS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this Institutional Review board (IRB)-approved retrospective study, 57 women were diagnosed with pathologically confirmed RAS during the study period (January 1999 to May 2013). Seventeen women underwent pretreatment breast MRI (prior to surgical resection or chemotherapy), of which 16 studies were available for review. Imaging features, including all available mammograms, ultrasounds, and breast MRIs, of these patients were evaluated by two radiologists independently and correlated with clinical management and outcomes. RESULTS: The median age of patients at original breast cancer diagnosis was 69.3 years (range 42-84 years), with average time from initial radiation therapy to diagnosis of RAS of 7.3 years (range 5.1-9.5 years). Nine women had mammograms (9/16, 56%) and six had breast ultrasound (US) (6/16, 38%) prior to MRI, which demonstrated nonsuspicious findings in 5/9 mammograms and 3/6 ultrasounds. Four patients had distinct intraparenchymal masses on mammogram and MRI. MRI findings included diffuse T2 high signal skin thickening (16/16, 100%). Nearly half (7/16, 44%) of patients had T2 low signal intensity lesions; all lesions rapidly enhanced on postcontrast T1 -weighted imaging. All women underwent surgical resection, with 8/16 (50%) receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Four women died during the study period. CONCLUSION: Clinical, mammographic, and sonographic findings of RAS are nonspecific and may be occult on conventional breast imaging; MRI findings of RAS include rapidly enhancing dermal and intraparenchymal lesions, some of which are low signal on T2 weighted imaging.