Publications by Year: 2009

2009
Qazi AA, Radmanesh A, O'Donnell L, Kindlmann G, Peled S, Whalen S, Westin C-F, Golby AJ. Resolving crossings in the corticospinal tract by two-tensor streamline tractography: Method and clinical assessment using fMRI. Neuroimage. 2009;47 Suppl 2 :T98-106.Abstract
An inherent drawback of the traditional diffusion tensor model is its limited ability to provide detailed information about multidirectional fiber architecture within a voxel. This leads to erroneous fiber tractography results in locations where fiber bundles cross each other. This may lead to the inability to visualize clinically important tracts such as the lateral projections of the corticospinal tract. In this report, we present a deterministic two-tensor eXtended Streamline Tractography (XST) technique, which successfully traces through regions of crossing fibers. We evaluated the method on simulated and in vivo human brain data, comparing the results with the traditional single-tensor and with a probabilistic tractography technique. By tracing the corticospinal tract and correlating with fMRI-determined motor cortex in both healthy subjects and patients with brain tumors, we demonstrate that two-tensor deterministic streamline tractography can accurately identify fiber bundles consistent with anatomy and previously not detected by conventional single-tensor tractography. When compared to the dense connectivity maps generated by probabilistic tractography, the method is computationally efficient and generates discrete geometric pathways that are simple to visualize and clinically useful. Detection of crossing white matter pathways can improve neurosurgical visualization of functionally relevant white matter areas.
Lee J-H, Ryu J, Jolesz FA, Cho Z-H, Yoo S-S. Brain-machine interface via real-time fMRI: preliminary study on thought-controlled robotic arm. Neurosci Lett. 2009;450 (1) :1-6.Abstract
Real-time functional MRI (rtfMRI) has been used as a basis for brain-computer interface (BCI) due to its ability to characterize region-specific brain activity in real-time. As an extension of BCI, we present an rtfMRI-based brain-machine interface (BMI) whereby 2-dimensional movement of a robotic arm was controlled by the regulation (and concurrent detection) of regional cortical activations in the primary motor areas. To do so, the subjects were engaged in the right- and/or left-hand motor imagery tasks. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal originating from the corresponding hand motor areas was then translated into horizontal or vertical robotic arm movement. The movement was broadcasted visually back to the subject as a feedback. We demonstrated that real-time control of the robotic arm only through the subjects' thought processes was possible using the rtfMRI-based BMI trials.
Roebuck JR, Haker SJ, Mitsouras D, Rybicki FJ, Tempany CM, Mulkern RV. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill imaging of prostate cancer: quantitative T2 values for cancer discrimination. Magn Reson Imaging. 2009;27 (4) :497-502.Abstract
Quantitative, apparent T(2) values of suspected prostate cancer and healthy peripheral zone tissue in men with prostate cancer were measured using a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) imaging sequence in order to assess the cancer discrimination potential of tissue T(2) values. The CPMG imaging sequence was used to image the prostates of 18 men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Whole gland coverage with nominal voxel volumes of 0.54 x 1.1 x 4 mm(3) was obtained in 10.7 min, resulting in data sets suitable for generating high-quality images with variable T(2)-weighting and for evaluating quantitative T(2) values on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Region-of-interest analysis of suspected healthy peripheral zone tissue and suspected cancer, identified on the basis of both T(1)- and T(2)-weighted signal intensities and available histopathology reports, yielded significantly (P<.0001) longer apparent T(2) values in suspected healthy tissue (193+/-49 ms) vs. suspected cancer (100+/-26 ms), suggesting potential utility of this method as a tissue specific discrimination index for prostate cancer. We conclude that CPMG imaging of the prostate can be performed in reasonable scan times and can provide advantages over T(2)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) imaging alone, including quantitative T(2) values for cancer discrimination as well as proton density maps without the point spread function degradation associated with short effective echo time FSE sequences.
Tie Y, Suarez RO, Whalen S, Radmanesh A, Norton IH, Golby AJ. Comparison of blocked and event-related fMRI designs for pre-surgical language mapping. Neuroimage. 2009;47 Suppl 2 :T107-15.Abstract
Language functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a promising non-invasive technique for pre-surgical planning in patients whose lesions are adjacent to or within critical language areas. Most language fMRI studies in patients use blocked experimental design. In this study, we compared a blocked design and a rapid event-related design with a jittered inter-stimulus-interval (ISI) (or stochastic design) for language fMRI in six healthy controls, and eight brain tumor patients, using a vocalized antonym generation task. Comparisons were based on visual inspection of fMRI activation maps and degree of language lateralization, both of which were assessed at a constant statistical threshold for each design. The results indicated a relatively high degree of discordance between the two task designs. In general, the event-related design provided maps with more robust activations in the putative language areas than the blocked design, especially for brain tumor patients. Our results suggest that the rapid event-related design has potential for providing comparable or even higher detection power over the blocked design for localizing language function in brain tumor patients, and therefore may be able to generate more sensitive language maps. More patient studies, and further investigation and optimization of language fMRI paradigms will be needed to determine the utility and validity of this approach for pre-surgical planning.
Savadjiev P, Kindlmann G, Bouix S, Shenton ME, Westin C-F. Local white matter geometry indices from diffusion tensor gradients. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2009;12 (Pt 1) :345-52.Abstract
We introduce a framework for computing geometrical properties of white matter fibres directly from diffusion tensor fields. The key idea is to isolate the portion of the gradient of the tensor field corresponding to local variation in tensor orientation, and to project it onto a coordinate frame of tensor eigenvectors. The resulting eigenframe-centered representation makes it possible to define scalar geometrical measures that describe the underlying white matter fibres, directly from the diffusion tensor field and its gradient, without requiring prior tractography. We define two new scalar measures of (1) fibre dispersion and (2) fibre curving, and we demonstrate them on synthetic and in-vivo datasets. Finally, we illustrate their applicability in a group study on schizophrenia.
Tokuda J, Schmitt M, Sun Y, Patz S, Tang Y, Mountford CE, Hata N, Wald LL, Hatabu H. Lung motion and volume measurement by dynamic 3D MRI using a 128-channel receiver coil. Acad Radiol. 2009;16 (1) :22-7.Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The authors present their initial experience using a 3-T whole-body scanner equipped with a 128-channel coil applied to lung motion assessment. Recent improvements in fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology have enabled several trials of free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the lung. A large number of image frames necessarily increases the difficulty of image analysis and therefore warrants automatic image processing. However, the intensity homogeneities of images of prior dynamic 3D lung MRI studies have been insufficient to use such methods. In this study, initial data were obtained at 3 T with a 128-channel coil that demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring multiple sets of 3D pulmonary scans during free breathing and that have sufficient quality to be amenable to automatic segmentation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dynamic 3D images of the lungs of two volunteers were acquired with acquisition times of 0.62 to 0.76 frames/s and an image matrix of 128 x 128, with 24 to 30 slice encodings. The volunteers were instructed to take shallow and deep breaths during the scans. The variation of lung volume was measured from the segmented images. RESULTS: Dynamic 3D images were successfully acquired for both respiratory conditions for each subject. The images showed whole-lung motion, including lifting of the chest wall and the displacement of the diaphragm, with sufficient contrast to distinguish these structures from adjacent tissues. The average time to complete segmentation for one 3D image was 4.8 seconds. The tidal volume measured was consistent with known tidal volumes for healthy subjects performing deep-breathing maneuvers. The temporal resolution was insufficient to measure tidal volumes for shallow breathing. CONCLUSION: This initial experience with a 3-T whole-body scanner and a 128-channel coil showed that the scanner and imaging protocol provided dynamic 3D images with spatial and temporal resolution sufficient to delineate the diaphragmatic domes and chest wall during active breathing. In addition, the intensity homogeneities and signal-to-noise ratio were adequate to perform automatic segmentation.
Kim YB, Bae KH, Yoo S-S, Park TG, Park HW. Positive contrast visualization for cellular magnetic resonance imaging using susceptibility-weighted echo-time encoding. Magn Reson Imaging. 2009;27 (5) :601-10.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate a method to generate positive contrast, selective to superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled cells, using the susceptibility-weighted echo-time encoding technique (SWEET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: SPIO-labeled human epidermal carcinoma (KB) cells were placed in a gel phantom. Positive contrast from the labeled cells was created by subtraction between conventional spin-echo images and echo-time shifted susceptibility-weighted images. SPIO-labeled cells were injected into the left dorsal flank and hind limb of nude mice, and unlabeled cells were placed on the right side as controls. Tumor growth was monitored using the proposed method, and a histological analysis was used to confirm the presence of the labeled cells. RESULTS: Based on in vitro testing, we could detect 5000 labeled cells at minimum and the number of pixels with positive contrast increased proportionally to the number of labeled cells. Animal experiments also revealed the presence of tumor growth from SPIO-loaded cells. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that the proposed method, based on the simple principle of echo-time shift, could be readily implemented in a clinical scanner to visualize the magnetic susceptibility effects of SPIO-loaded cells through a positive-contrast mechanism.
Malcolm JG, Shenton ME, Rathi Y. Two-tensor tractography using a constrained filter. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2009;12 (Pt 1) :894-902.Abstract
We describe a technique to simultaneously estimate a weighted, positive-definite multi-tensor fiber model and perform tractography. Existing techniques estimate the local fiber orientation at each voxel independently so there is no running knowledge of confidence in the estimated fiber model. We formulate fiber tracking as recursive estimation: at each step of tracing the fiber, the current estimate is guided by the previous. To do this we model the signal as a weighted mixture of Gaussian tensors and perform tractography within a filter framework. Starting from a seed point, each fiber is traced to its termination using an unscented Kalman filter to simultaneously fit the local model and propagate in the most consistent direction. Further, we modify the Kalman filter to enforce model constraints, i.e. positive eigenvalues and convex weights. Despite the presence of noise and uncertainty, this provides a causal estimate of the local structure at each point along the fiber. Synthetic experiments demonstrate that this approach significantly improves the angular resolution at crossings and branchings while consistently estimating the mixture weights. In vivo experiments confirm the ability to trace out fibers in areas known to contain such crossing and branching while providing inherent path regularization.
Lee J-H, Marzelli M, Jolesz FA, Yoo S-S. Automated classification of fMRI data employing trial-based imagery tasks. Med Image Anal. 2009;13 (3) :392-404.Abstract
Automated interpretation and classification of functional MRI (fMRI) data is an emerging research field that enables the characterization of underlying cognitive processes with minimal human intervention. In this work, we present a method for the automated classification of human thoughts reflected on a trial-based paradigm using fMRI with a significantly shortened data acquisition time (less than one minute). Based on our preliminary experience with various cognitive imagery tasks, six characteristic thoughts were chosen as target tasks for the present work: right-hand motor imagery, left-hand motor imagery, right foot motor imagery, mental calculation, internal speech/word generation, and visual imagery. These six tasks were performed by five healthy volunteers and functional images were obtained using a T(*)(2)-weighted echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Feature vectors from activation maps, necessary for the classification of neural activity, were automatically extracted from the regions that were consistently and exclusively activated for a given task during the training process. Extracted feature vectors were classified using the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. Parameter optimization, using a k-fold cross validation scheme, allowed the successful recognition of the six different categories of administered thought tasks with an accuracy of 74.5% (mean)+/-14.3% (standard deviation) across all five subjects. Our proposed study for the automated classification of fMRI data may be utilized in further investigations to monitor/identify human thought processes and their potential link to hardware/computer control.
Rubin DL, Talos I-F, Halle M, Musen MA, Kikinis R. Computational neuroanatomy: ontology-based representation of neural components and connectivity. BMC Bioinformatics. 2009;10 Suppl 2 :S3.Abstract
BACKGROUND: A critical challenge in neuroscience is organizing, managing, and accessing the explosion in neuroscientific knowledge, particularly anatomic knowledge. We believe that explicit knowledge-based approaches to make neuroscientific knowledge computationally accessible will be helpful in tackling this challenge and will enable a variety of applications exploiting this knowledge, such as surgical planning. RESULTS: We developed ontology-based models of neuroanatomy to enable symbolic lookup, logical inference and mathematical modeling of neural systems. We built a prototype model of the motor system that integrates descriptive anatomic and qualitative functional neuroanatomical knowledge. In addition to modeling normal neuroanatomy, our approach provides an explicit representation of abnormal neural connectivity in disease states, such as common movement disorders. The ontology-based representation encodes both structural and functional aspects of neuroanatomy. The ontology-based models can be evaluated computationally, enabling development of automated computer reasoning applications. CONCLUSION: Neuroanatomical knowledge can be represented in machine-accessible format using ontologies. Computational neuroanatomical approaches such as described in this work could become a key tool in translational informatics, leading to decision support applications that inform and guide surgical planning and personalized care for neurological disease in the future.
Ababneh ZQ, Beloeil H, Berde CB, Ababneh AM, Maier SE, Mulkern RV. In vivo lipid diffusion coefficient measurements in rat bone marrow. Magn Reson Imaging. 2009;27 (6) :859-64.Abstract
The diffusion coefficient of lipids, D(l), within bone marrow, fat deposits and metabolically active intracellular lipids in vivo will depend on several factors including the precise chemical composition of the lipid distribution (chain lengths, degree of unsaturation, etc.) as well as the temperature. As such, D(l) may ultimately prove of value in assessing abnormal fatty acid distributions linked to diseases such as cystic fibrosis, diabetes and coronary heart disease. A sensitive temperature dependence of D(l) may also prove of value for MR-guided thermal therapies for bone tumors or disease within other fatty tissues like the breast. Measuring diffusion coefficients of high molecular weight lipids in vivo is, however, technically difficult for a number of reasons. For instance, due to the much lower diffusion coefficients compared to water, much higher b factors than those used for central nervous system applications are needed. In addition, the pulse sequence design must incorporate, as much as possible, immunity to motion, susceptibility and chemical shift effects present whenever body imaging is performed. In this work, high b-factor line scan diffusion imaging sequences were designed, implemented and tested for D(l) measurement using a 4.7-T horizontal bore animal scanner. The gradient set available allowed for b factors as high as 0.03 micros/nm(2) (30,000 s/mm(2)) at echo times as short as 42 ms. The methods were used to measure lipid diffusion coefficients within the marrow of rat paws in vivo, yielding lipid diffusion coefficients approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than typical tissue water diffusion coefficients. Phantom experiments that demonstrate the sensitivity of lipid diffusion coefficients to chain length and temperature were also performed.
Voineskos AN, O'Donnell LJ, Lobaugh NJ, Markant D, Ameis SH, Niethammer M, Mulsant BH, Pollock BG, Kennedy JL, Westin CF, et al. Quantitative examination of a novel clustering method using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor tractography. Neuroimage. 2009;45 (2) :370-6.Abstract
MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure and visualize organization of white matter fibre tracts in vivo. DTI is a relatively new imaging technique, and new tools developed for quantifying fibre tracts require evaluation. The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability of a novel clustering approach with a multiple region of interest (MROI) approach in both healthy and disease (schizophrenia) populations. DTI images were acquired in 20 participants (n=10 patients with schizophrenia: 56+/-15 years; n=10 controls: 51+/-20 years) (1.5 T GE system) with diffusion gradients applied in 23 non-collinear directions, repeated three times. Whole brain seeding and creation of fibre tracts were then performed. Interrater reliability of the clustering approach, and the MROI approach, were each evaluated and the methods compared. There was high spatial (voxel-based) agreement within and between the clustering and MROI methods. Fractional anisotropy, trace, and radial and axial diffusivity values showed high intraclass correlation (p<0.001 for all tracts) for each approach. Differences in scalar indices of diffusion between the clustering and MROI approach were minimal. The excellent interrater reliability of the clustering method and high agreement with the MROI method, quantitatively and spatially, indicates that the clustering method can be used with confidence. The clustering method avoids biases of ROI drawing and placement, and, not limited by a priori predictions, may be a more robust and efficient way to identify and measure white matter tracts of interest.
O'Donnell LJ, Westin C-F, Golby AJ. Tract-based morphometry for white matter group analysis. Neuroimage. 2009;45 (3) :832-44.Abstract
We introduce an automatic method that we call tract-based morphometry, or TBM, for measurement and analysis of diffusion MRI data along white matter fiber tracts. Using subject-specific tractography bundle segmentations, we generate an arc length parameterization of the bundle with point correspondences across all fibers and all subjects, allowing tract-based measurement and analysis. In this paper we present a quantitative comparison of fiber coordinate systems from the literature and we introduce an improved optimal match method that reduces spatial distortion and improves intra- and inter-subject variability of FA measurements. We propose a method for generating arc length correspondences across hemispheres, enabling a TBM study of interhemispheric diffusion asymmetries in the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and cingulum bundle (CB). The results of this study demonstrate that TBM can detect differences that may not be found by measuring means of scalar invariants in entire tracts, such as the mean diffusivity (MD) differences found in AF. We report TBM results of higher fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left hemisphere in AF (caused primarily by lower lambda(3), the smallest eigenvalue of the diffusion tensor, in the left AF), and higher left hemisphere FA in CB (related to higher lambda(1), the largest eigenvalue of the diffusion tensor, in the left CB). By mapping the significance levels onto the tractography trajectories for each structure, we demonstrate the anatomical locations of the interhemispheric differences. The TBM approach brings analysis of DTI data into the clinically and neuroanatomically relevant framework of the tract anatomy.
Peled S, Whalen S, Jolesz FA, Golby AJ. High b-value apparent diffusion-weighted images from CURVE-ball DTI. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2009;30 (1) :243-8.Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the utility of a proposed clinical diffusion imaging scheme for rapidly generating multiple b-value diffusion contrast in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our strategy for efficient image acquisition relies on the invariance property of the diffusion tensor eigenvectors to b-value. A simple addition to the conventional diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) data acquisition scheme used for tractography yields diffusion-weighted images at twice and three times the conventional b-value. An example from a neurosurgical brain tumor is shown. Apparent diffusion-weighted (ADW) images were calculated for b-values 800, 1600, and 2400 s/mm(2), and a map of excess diffusive kurtosis was computed from the three ADWs. RESULTS: High b-value ADW images demonstrated decreased contrast between normal gray and white matter, while the heterogeneity and contrast of the lesion was emphasized relative to conventional b-value data. Kurtosis maps indicated the deviation from Gaussian diffusive behavior. CONCLUSION: DTI data with multiple b-values and good SNR can be acquired in clinically reasonable times. High b-value ADW images show increased contrast and add information to conventional DWI. Ambiguity in conventional b-value images over whether hyperintense signal results from abnormally low diffusion, or abnormally long T(2), is better resolved in high b-value images.
Jolesz FA. MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery. Annu Rev Med. 2009;60 :417-30.Abstract
MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) surgery is a noninvasive thermal ablation method that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for target definition, treatment planning, and closed-loop control of energy deposition. Integrating FUS and MRI as a therapy delivery system allows us to localize, target, and monitor in real time, and thus to ablate targeted tissue without damaging normal structures. This precision makes MRgFUS an attractive alternative to surgical resection or radiation therapy of benign and malignant tumors. Already approved for the treatment of uterine fibroids, MRgFUS is in ongoing clinical trials for the treatment of breast, liver, prostate, and brain cancer and for the palliation of pain in bone metastasis. In addition to thermal ablation, FUS, with or without the use of microbubbles, can temporarily change vascular or cell membrane permeability and release or activate various compounds for targeted drug delivery or gene therapy. A disruptive technology, MRgFUS provides new therapeutic approaches and may cause major changes in patient management and several medical disciplines.
Mislow JMK, Golby AJ, Black PM. Origins of intraoperative MRI. Neurosurg Clin N Am. 2009;20 (2) :137-46.Abstract
Neurosurgical diagnosis and intervention has evolved through improved neuroimaging, allowing better visualization of anatomy and pathology. This article discusses the various systems that have been designed over the last decade to meet the requirements of neurosurgical patients and opines on the potential future developments in the technology and application of intraoperative MRI. Because the greatest amount of experience with intraoperative MRI comes from its use in brain tumor resection, this article focuses on the origins of intraoperative MRI in relation to this field.
Grissom WA, Kerr AB, Holbrook AB, Pauly JM, Butts-Pauly K. Maximum linear-phase spectral-spatial radiofrequency pulses for fat-suppressed proton resonance frequency-shift MR Thermometry. Magn Reson Med. 2009;62 (5) :1242-50.Abstract
Conventional spectral-spatial pulses used for water-selective excitation in proton resonance frequency-shift MR thermometry require increased sequence length compared to shorter wideband pulses. This is because spectral-spatial pulses are longer than wideband pulses, and the echo time period starts midway through them. Therefore, for a fixed echo time, one must increase sequence length to accommodate conventional spectral-spatial pulses in proton resonance frequency-shift thermometry. We introduce improved water-selective spectral-spatial pulses for which the echo time period starts near the beginning of excitation. Instead of requiring increased sequence length, these pulses extend into the long echo time periods common to PRF sequences. The new pulses therefore alleviate the traditional tradeoff between sequence length and fat suppression. We experimentally demonstrate an 11% improvement in frame rate in a proton resonance frequency imaging sequence compared to conventional spectral-spatial excitation. We also introduce a novel spectral-spatial pulse design technique that is a hybrid of previous model- and filter-based techniques and that inherits advantages from both. We experimentally validate the pulses' performance in suppressing lipid signal and in reducing sequence length compared to conventional spectral-spatial pulses.
Risholm P, Samsett E, Talos I-F, Wells W. A non-rigid registration framework that accommodates resection and retraction. Inf Process Med Imaging. 2009;21 :447-58.Abstract
Traditional non-rigid registration algorithms are incapable of accurately registering intra-operative with pre-operative images whenever tissue has been resected or retracted. In this work we present methods for detecting and handling retraction and resection. The registration framework is based on the bijective Demons algorithm using an anisotropic diffusion smoother. Retraction is detected at areas of the deformation field with high internal strain and the estimated retraction boundary is integrated as a diffusion boundary in the smoother to allow discontinuities to develop across the resection boundary. Resection is detected by a level set method evolving in the space where image intensities disagree. The estimated resection is integrated into the smoother as a diffusion sink to restrict image forces originating inside the resection from being diffused to surrounding areas. In addition, the deformation field is continuous across the diffusion sink boundary which allow us to move the boundary of the diffusion sink without changing values in the deformation field (no interpolation or extrapolation is needed). We present preliminary results on both synthetic and clinical data which clearly shows the added value of explicitly modeling these processes in a registration framework.
Fischer K, McDannold NJ, Zhang Y, Kardos M, Szabo A, Szabo A, Reusz GS, Jolesz FA. Renal ultrafiltration changes induced by focused US. Radiology. 2009;253 (3) :697-705.Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine if focused ultrasonography (US) combined with a diagnostic microbubble-based US contrast agent can be used to modulate glomerular ultrafiltration and size selectivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The experiments were approved by the animal care committee. The left kidney of 17 healthy rabbits was sonicated by using a 260-kHz focused US transducer in the presence of a microbubble-based US contrast agent. The right kidney served as the control. Three acoustic power levels were applied: 0.4 W (six rabbits), 0.9 W (six rabbits), and 1.7 W (five rabbits). Three rabbits were not treated with focused US and served as control animals. The authors evaluated changes in glomerular size selectivity by measuring the clearance rates of 3000- and 70,000-Da fluorescence-neutral dextrans. The creatinine clearance was calculated for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate. The urinary protein-creatinine ratio was monitored during the experiments. The authors assessed tubular function by evaluating the fractional sodium excretion, tubular reabsorption of phosphate, and gamma-glutamyltransferase-creatinine ratio. Whole-kidney histologic analysis was performed. For each measurement, the values obtained before and after sonication were compared by using the paired t test. RESULTS: Significant (P < .05) increases in the relative (ratio of treated kidney value/nontreated kidney value) clearance of small- and large-molecule agents and the urine flow rates that resulted from the focused US treatments were observed. Overall, 1.23-, 1.23-, 1.61-, and 1.47-fold enhancement of creatinine clearance, 3000-Da dextran clearance, 70 000-Da dextran clearance, and urine flow rate, respectively, were observed. Focal tubular hemorrhage and transient functional tubular alterations were observed at only the highest (1.7-W) acoustic power level tested. CONCLUSION: Glomerular ultrafiltration and size selectivity can be temporarily modified with simultaneous application of US and microbubbles. This method could offer new opportunities for treatment of renal disease.
Wang X, Grimson EWL, Westin C-F. Tractography segmentation using a hierarchical Dirichlet processes mixture model. Inf Process Med Imaging. 2009;21 :101-13.Abstract
In this paper, we propose a new nonparametric Bayesian framework to cluster white matter fiber tracts into bundles using a hierarchical Dirichlet processes mixture (HDPM) model. The number of clusters is automatically learnt from data with a Dirichlet process (DP) prior instead of being manually specified. After the models of bundles have been learnt from training data without supervision, they can be used as priors to cluster/classify fibers of new subjects. When clustering fibers of new subjects, new clusters can be created for structures not observed in the training data. Our approach does not require computing pairwise distances between fibers and can cluster a huge set of fibers across multiple subjects without subsampling. We present results on multiple data sets, the largest of which has more than 120, 000 fibers.

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