Dispersion in Tissue-Mimicking Gels Measured with Shear Wave Elastography and Torsional Vibration Rheometry

Date Published:

2018 Nov 22

Abstract:

Dispersion, or the frequency dependence of mechanical parameters, is a primary confounding factor in elastography comparisons. We present a study of dispersion in tissue-mimicking gels over a wide frequency band using a combination of ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE), and a novel torsional vibration rheometry which allows independent mechanical measurement of SWE samples. Frequency-dependent complex shear modulus was measured in homogeneous gelatin hydrogels of two different bloom strengths while controlling for confounding factors such as temperature, water content and material aging. Furthermore, both techniques measured the same physical samples, thereby eliminating possible variation caused by batch-to-batch gel variation, sample geometry differences and boundary artifacts. The wide-band measurement, from 1 to 1800 Hz, captured a 30%-50% increase in the storage modulus and a nearly linear increase with frequency of the loss modulus. The magnitude of the variation suggests that accounting for dispersion is essential for meaningful comparisons between SWE implementations.

Last updated on 01/24/2019