Mapping Cognitive and Emotional Networks in Neurosurgical Patients Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Citation:

Michael P Catalino, Shun Yao, Deborah L Green, Edward R Laws, Alexandra J Golby, and Yanmei Tie. 2020. “Mapping Cognitive and Emotional Networks in Neurosurgical Patients Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” Neurosurg Focus, 48, 2, Pp. E9. Copy at http://www.tinyurl.com/yab33d3d

Abstract:

Neurosurgery has been at the forefront of a paradigm shift from a localizationist perspective to a network-based approach to brain mapping. Over the last 2 decades, we have seen dramatic improvements in the way we can image the human brain and noninvasively estimate the location of critical functional networks. In certain patients with brain tumors and epilepsy, intraoperative electrical stimulation has revealed direct links between these networks and their function. The focus of these techniques has rightfully been identification and preservation of so-called "eloquent" brain functions (i.e., motor and language), but there is building momentum for more extensive mapping of cognitive and emotional networks. In addition, there is growing interest in mapping these functions in patients with a broad range of neurosurgical diseases. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that is able to measure spontaneous low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent signal fluctuations at rest to infer neuronal activity. Rs-fMRI may be able to map cognitive and emotional networks for individual patients. In this review, the authors give an overview of the rs-fMRI technique and associated cognitive and emotional resting-state networks, discuss the potential applications of rs-fMRI, and propose future directions for the mapping of cognition and emotion in neurosurgical patients.
Last updated on 12/14/2020