Publications by Year: 2017

2017
Glazer DI, Hassanzadeh E, Fedorov A, Olubiyi OI, Goldberger SS, Penzkofer T, Flood TA, Masry P, Mulkern RV, Hirsch MS, et al. Diffusion-weighted Endorectal MR Imaging at 3T for Prostate Cancer: Correlation with Tumor Cell Density and Percentage Gleason Pattern on Whole Mount Pathology. Abdom Radiol (NY). 2017;42 (3) :918-25.Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if tumor cell density and percentage of Gleason pattern within an outlined volumetric tumor region of interest (TROI) on whole-mount pathology (WMP) correlate with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on corresponding TROIs outlined on pre-operative MRI. METHODS: Men with biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma undergoing multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) prior to prostatectomy were consented to this prospective study. WMP and mpMRI images were viewed using 3D Slicer and each TROI from WMP was contoured on the high b-value ADC maps (b0, 1400). For each TROI outlined on WMP, TCD (tumor cell density) and the percentage of Gleason pattern 3, 4, and 5 were recorded. The ADCmean, ADC10th percentile, ADC90th percentile, and ADCratio were also calculated in each case from the ADC maps using 3D Slicer. RESULTS: Nineteen patients with 21 tumors were included in this study. ADCmean values for TROIs were 944.8 ± 327.4 vs. 1329.9 ± 201.6 mm(2)/s for adjacent non-neoplastic prostate tissue (p < 0.001). ADCmean, ADC10th percentile, and ADCratio values for higher grade tumors were lower than those of lower grade tumors (mean 809.71 and 1176.34 mm(2)/s, p = 0.014; 10th percentile 613.83 and 1018.14 mm(2)/s, p = 0.009; ratio 0.60 and 0.94, p = 0.005). TCD and ADCmean (ρ = -0.61, p = 0.005) and TCD and ADC10th percentile (ρ = -0.56, p = 0.01) were negatively correlated. No correlation was observed between percentage of Gleason pattern and ADC values. CONCLUSION: DWI MRI can characterize focal prostate cancer using ADCratio, ADC10th percentile, and ADCmean, which correlate with pathological tumor cell density.

Mitsouras D, Lee TC, Liacouras P, Ionita CN, Pietilla T, Maier SE, Mulkern RV. Three-dimensional Printing of MRI-visible Phantoms and MR Image-guided Therapy Simulation. Magn Reson Med. 2017;77 (2) :613-22.Abstract

PURPOSE: To demonstrate the use of anatomic MRI-visible three-dimensional (3D)-printed phantoms and to assess process accuracy and material MR signal properties. METHODS: A cervical spine model was generated from computed tomography (CT) data and 3D-printed using an MR signal-generating material. Printed phantom accuracy and signal characteristics were assessed using 120 kVp CT and 3 Tesla (T) MR imaging. The MR relaxation rates and diffusion coefficient of the fabricated phantom were measured and (1) H spectra were acquired to provide insight into the nature of the proton signal. Finally, T2 -weighted imaging was performed during cryoablation of the model. RESULTS: The printed model produced a CT signal of 102 ± 8 Hounsfield unit, and an MR signal roughly 1/3(rd) that of saline in short echo time/short repetition time GRE MRI (456 ± 36 versus 1526 ± 121 arbitrary signal units). Compared with the model designed from the in vivo CT scan, the printed model differed by 0.13 ± 0.11 mm in CT, and 0.62 ± 0.28 mm in MR. The printed material had T2 ∼32 ms, T2*∼7 ms, T1 ∼193 ms, and a very small diffusion coefficient less than olive oil. MRI monitoring of the cryoablation demonstrated iceball formation similar to an in vivo procedure. CONCLUSION: Current 3D printing technology can be used to print anatomically accurate phantoms that can be imaged by both CT and MRI. Such models can be used to simulate MRI-guided interventions such as cryosurgeries. Future development of the proposed technique can potentially lead to printed models that depict different tissues and anatomical structures with different MR signal characteristics. 

Hassanzadeh E, Glazer DI, Dunne RM, Fennessy FM, Harisinghani MG, Tempany CM. Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS v2): A Pictorial Review. Abdom Radiol (NY). 2017;42 (1) :278-89.Abstract

The most recent edition of the prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS version 2) was developed based on expert consensus of the international working group on prostate cancer. It provides the minimum acceptable technical standards for MR image acquisition and suggests a structured method for multiparametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) reporting. T1-weighted, T2-weighted (T2W), diffusion-weighted (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging are the suggested sequences to include in mpMRI. The PI-RADS version 2 scoring system enables the reader to assess and rate all focal lesions detected at mpMRI to determine the likelihood of a clinically significant cancer. According to PI-RADS v2, a lesion with a Gleason score ≥7, volume >0.5 cc, or extraprostatic extension is considered clinically significant. PI-RADS v2 uses the concept of a dominant MR sequence based on zonal location of the lesion rather than summing each component score, as was the case in version 1. The dominant sequence in the peripheral zone is DWI and the corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, with a secondary role for DCE in equivocal cases (PI-RADS score 3). For lesions in the transition zone, T2W images are the dominant sequence with DWI/ADC images playing a supporting role in the case of an equivocal lesion.

Sastry R, Bi WL, Pieper S, Frisken S, Kapur T, Wells W, Golby AJ. Applications of Ultrasound in the Resection of Brain Tumors. J Neuroimaging. 2017;27 (1) :5-15.Abstract

Neurosurgery makes use of preoperative imaging to visualize pathology, inform surgical planning, and evaluate the safety of selected approaches. The utility of preoperative imaging for neuronavigation, however, is diminished by the well-characterized phenomenon of brain shift, in which the brain deforms intraoperatively as a result of craniotomy, swelling, gravity, tumor resection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, and many other factors. As such, there is a need for updated intraoperative information that accurately reflects intraoperative conditions. Since 1982, intraoperative ultrasound has allowed neurosurgeons to craft and update operative plans without ionizing radiation exposure or major workflow interruption. Continued evolution of ultrasound technology since its introduction has resulted in superior imaging quality, smaller probes, and more seamless integration with neuronavigation systems. Furthermore, the introduction of related imaging modalities, such as 3-dimensional ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, high-frequency ultrasound, and ultrasound elastography, has dramatically expanded the options available to the neurosurgeon intraoperatively. In the context of these advances, we review the current state, potential, and challenges of intraoperative ultrasound for brain tumor resection. We begin by evaluating these ultrasound technologies and their relative advantages and disadvantages. We then review three specific applications of these ultrasound technologies to brain tumor resection: (1) intraoperative navigation, (2) assessment of extent of resection, and (3) brain shift monitoring and compensation. We conclude by identifying opportunities for future directions in the development of ultrasound technologies.

Ciris PA, Cheng C-C, Mei C-S, Panych LP, Madore B. Dual-Pathway Sequences for MR Thermometry: When and Where to use Them. Magn Reson Med. 2017;77 (3) :1193-200.Abstract

PURPOSE: Dual-pathway sequences have been proposed to help improve the temperature-to-noise ratio (TNR) in MR thermometry. The present work establishes how much of an improvement these so-called "PSIF-FISP" sequences may bring in various organs and tissues. METHODS: Simulations and TNR calculations were validated against analytical equations, phantom, abdomen, and brain scans. Relative TNRs for PSIF-FISP, as compared to a dual-FISP reference standard, were calculated for flip angle (FA) = 1 to 85 º and repetition time (TR) = 6 to 60 ms, for gray matter, white matter, cervix, endometrium, myometrium, prostate, kidney medulla and cortex, bone marrow, pancreas, spleen, muscle, and liver tissues. RESULTS: PSIF-FISP was TNR superior in the kidney, pelvis, spleen, or gray matter at most tested TR and FA settings, and benefits increased at shorter TRs. PSIF-FISP was TNR superior in other tissues, e.g., liver, muscle, pancreas, for only short TR settings (20 ms or less). The TNR benefits of PSIF-FISP increased slightly with FA, and strongly with decreasing TR. Up to two- to three-fold reductions in TR with 20% TNR gains were achievable. In any given tissue, TNR performance is expected to further improve with heating, due to changes in relaxation rates. CONCLUSION: Dual-pathway PSIF-FISP can improve TNR and acquisition speed over standard gradient-recalled echo sequences, but optimal acquisition parameters are tissue dependent. Magn Reson Med 77:1193-1200, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

Chao T-C, Chiou J-yuan G, Maier SE, Madore B. Fast Diffusion Imaging with High Angular Resolution. Magn Reson Med. 2017;77 (2) :696-706.Abstract

PURPOSE: High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is a well-established method to help reveal the architecture of nerve bundles, but long scan times and geometric distortions inherent to echo planar imaging (EPI) have limited its integration into clinical protocols. METHODS: A fast imaging method is proposed here that combines accelerated multishot diffusion imaging (AMDI), multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE), and crossing fiber angular resolution of intravoxel structure (CFARI) to reduce spatial distortions and reduce total scan time. A multishot EPI sequence was used to improve geometrical fidelity as compared to a single-shot EPI acquisition, and acceleration in both k-space and diffusion sampling enabled reductions in scan time. The method is regularized and self-navigated for motion correction. Seven volunteers were scanned in this study, including four with volumetric whole brain acquisitions. RESULTS: The average similarity of microstructural orientations between undersampled datasets and their fully sampled counterparts was above 85%, with scan times below 5 min for whole-brain acquisitions. Up to 2.7-fold scan time acceleration along with four-fold distortion reduction was achieved. CONCLUSION: The proposed imaging strategy can generate HARDI results with relatively good geometrical fidelity and low scan duration, which may help facilitate the transition of HARDI from a successful research tool to a practical clinical one. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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