Publications by Year: 2020

2020
Herz C, MacNeil K, Behringer PA, Tokuda J, Mehrtash A, Mousavi P, Kikinis R, Fennessy FM, Tempany CM, Tuncali K, et al. Open Source Platform for Transperineal In-bore MRI-guided Targeted Prostate Biopsy. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 2020;67 (2) :565-76.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Accurate biopsy sampling of the suspected lesions is critical for the diagnosis and clinical management of prostate cancer (PCa). Transperineal in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy (tpMRgBx) is a targeted biopsy technique that was shown to be safe, efficient and accurate. Our goal was to develop an open source software platform to support evaluation, refinement and translation of this biopsy approach. METHODS: We developed SliceTracker, a 3D Slicer extension to support tpMRgBx. We followed modular design of the implementation to enable customization of the interface, and interchange of image segmentation and registration components to assess their effect on the processing time, precision and accuracy of the biopsy needle placement. The platform and supporting documentation were developed to enable the use of software by an operator with minimal technical training to facilitate translation. Retrospective evaluation studied registration accuracy, effect of the prostate segmentation approach, and re-identification time of biopsy targets. Prospective evaluation focused on the total procedure time and biopsy targeting error (BTE). RESULTS: Evaluation utilized data from 73 retrospective and 10 prospective tpMRgBx cases. Mean Landmark Registration Error (LRE) for retrospective evaluation was 1.88 ±2.63 mm and was not sensitive to the approach used for prostate gland segmentation. Prospectively, we observed target re-identification time of 4.60 ±2.40 min, and BTE of 2.40 ±0.98 mm. CONCLUSION: SliceTracker is modular and extensible open source platform for supporting image processing aspects of the tpMRgBx procedure. It has been successfully utilized to support clinical research procedures at our site.
Leung LWL, Unadkat P, Bertotti MM, Bi WL, Essayed WI, Bunevicius A, Chavakula V, Rigolo L, Fumagalli L, Tie Z, et al. Clinical Utility of Preoperative Bilingual Language fMRI Mapping in Patients with Brain Tumors. J Neuroimaging. 2020.Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous literature has demonstrated disparity in the postoperative recovery of first and second language function of bilingual neurosurgical patients. However, it is unclear to whether preoperative brain mapping of both languages is needed. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of language task functional MRI (fMRI) implemented in both languages in bilingual patients. METHODS: We retrospectively examined fMRI data of 13 bilingual brain tumor patients (age: 23 to 59 years) who performed antonym generation task-based fMRIs in English and non-English language. The usefulness of bilingual language mapping was evaluated using a structured survey administered to 5 neurosurgeons. Additionally, quantitative comparison between the brain activation maps of both languages was performed. RESULTS: Survey responses revealed differences in raters' surgical approach, including asleep versus awake surgery and extent of resection, after viewing the language fMRI maps. Additional non-English fMRI led to changes in surgical decision-making and bettered localization of language areas. Quantitative analysis revealed an increase in laterality index (LI) in non-English fMRI compared to English fMRI. The Dice coefficient demonstrated fair overlap (.458 ± .160) between the activation maps. CONCLUSION: Bilingual fMRI mapping of bilingual patients allows to better appreciate functionally active language areas that may be neglected in single language mapping. Utility of bilingual mapping was supported by changes in both surgical approach and LI measurements, suggesting its benefit on preoperative language mapping.
Xie G, Zhang F, Leung L, Mooney MA, Epprecht L, Norton I, Rathi Y, Kikinis R, Al-Mefty O, Makris N, et al. Anatomical Assessment of Trigeminal Nerve Tractography Using Diffusion MRI: A Comparison of Acquisition B-Values and Single- and Multi-Fiber Tracking Strategies. Neuroimage Clin. 2020;25 :102160.Abstract
BACKGROUND: The trigeminal nerve (TGN) is the largest cranial nerve and can be involved in multiple inflammatory, compressive, ischemic or other pathologies. Currently, imaging-based approaches to identify the TGN mostly rely on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provides localization of the cisternal portion of the TGN where the contrast between nerve and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is high enough to allow differentiation. The course of the TGN within the brainstem as well as anterior to the cisternal portion, however, is more difficult to display on traditional imaging sequences. An advanced imaging technique, diffusion MRI (dMRI), enables tracking of the trajectory of TGN fibers and has the potential to visualize anatomical regions of the TGN not seen on T2-weighted imaging. This may allow a more comprehensive assessment of the nerve in the context of pathology. To date, most work in TGN tracking has used clinical dMRI acquisitions with a b-value of 1000 s/mm and conventional diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) tractography methods. Though higher b-value acquisitions and multi-tensor tractography methods are known to be beneficial for tracking brain white matter fiber tracts, there have been no studies conducted to evaluate the performance of these advanced approaches on nerve tracking of the TGN, in particular on tracking different anatomical regions of the TGN. OBJECTIVE: We compare TGN tracking performance using dMRI data with different b-values, in combination with both single- and multi-tensor tractography methods. Our goal is to assess the advantages and limitations of these different strategies for identifying the anatomical regions of the TGN. METHODS: We proposed seven anatomical rating criteria including true and false positive structures, and we performed an expert rating study of over 1000 TGN visualizations, as follows. We tracked the TGN using high-quality dMRI data from 100 healthy adult subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). TGN tracking performance was compared across dMRI acquisitions with b = 1000 s/mm, b = 2000 s/mm and b = 3000 s/mm, using single-tensor (1T) and two-tensor (2T) unscented Kalman filter (UKF) tractography. This resulted in a total of six tracking strategies. The TGN was identified using an anatomical region-of-interest (ROI) selection approach. First, in a subset of the dataset we identified ROIs that provided good TGN tracking performance across all tracking strategies. Using these ROIs, the TGN was then tracked in all subjects using the six tracking strategies. An expert rater (GX) visually assessed and scored each TGN based on seven anatomical judgment criteria. These criteria included the presence of multiple expected anatomical segments of the TGN (true positive structures), specifically branch-like structures, cisternal portion, mesencephalic trigeminal tract, and spinal cord tract of the TGN. False positive criteria included the presence of any fibers entering the temporal lobe, the inferior cerebellar peduncle, or the middle cerebellar peduncle. Expert rating scores were analyzed to compare TGN tracking performance across the six tracking strategies. Intra- and inter-rater validation was performed to assess the reliability of the expert TGN rating result. RESULTS: The TGN was selected using two anatomical ROIs (Meckel's Cave and cisternal portion of the TGN). The two-tensor tractography method had significantly better performance on identifying true positive structures, while generating more false positive streamlines in comparison to the single-tensor tractography method. TGN tracking performance was significantly different across the three b-values for almost all structures studied. Tracking performance was reported in terms of the percentage of subjects achieving each anatomical rating criterion. Tracking of the cisternal portion and branching structure of the TGN was generally successful, with the highest performance of over 98% using two-tensor tractography and b = 1000 or b = 2000. However, tracking the smaller mesencephalic and spinal cord tracts of the TGN was quite challenging (highest performance of 37.5% and 57.07%, using two-tensor tractography with b = 1000 and b = 2000, respectively). False positive connections to the temporal lobe (over 38% of subjects for all strategies) and cerebellar peduncles (100% of subjects for all strategies) were prevalent. High joint probability of agreement was obtained in the inter-rater (on average 83%) and intra-rater validation (on average 90%), showing a highly reliable expert rating result. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the results of the study suggest that researchers and clinicians may benefit from tailoring their acquisition and tracking methodology to the specific anatomical portion of the TGN that is of the greatest interest. For example, tracking of branching structures and TGN-T2 overlap can be best achieved with a two-tensor model and an acquisition using b = 1000 or b = 2000. In general, b = 1000 and b = 2000 acquisitions provided the best-rated tracking results. Further research is needed to improve both sensitivity and specificity of the depiction of the TGN anatomy using dMRI.
Frisken S, Luo M, Juvekar P, Bunevicius A, Machado I, Unadkat P, Bertotti MM, Toews M, Wells WM, Miga MI, et al. A Comparison of Thin-Plate Spline Deformation and Finite Element Modeling to Compensate for Brain Shift during Tumor Resection. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2020;15 (1) :75-85.Abstract
PURPOSE: Brain shift during tumor resection can progressively invalidate the accuracy of neuronavigation systems and affect neurosurgeons' ability to achieve optimal resections. This paper compares two methods that have been presented in the literature to compensate for brain shift: a thin-plate spline deformation model and a finite element method (FEM). For this comparison, both methods are driven by identical sparse data. Specifically, both methods are driven by displacements between automatically detected and matched feature points from intraoperative 3D ultrasound (iUS). Both methods have been shown to be fast enough for intraoperative brain shift correction (Machado et al. in Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg 13(10):1525-1538, 2018; Luo et al. in J Med Imaging (Bellingham) 4(3):035003, 2017). However, the spline method requires no preprocessing and ignores physical properties of the brain while the FEM method requires significant preprocessing and incorporates patient-specific physical and geometric constraints. The goal of this work was to explore the relative merits of these methods on recent clinical data. METHODS: Data acquired during 19 sequential tumor resections in Brigham and Women's Hospital's Advanced Multi-modal Image-Guided Operating Suite between December 2017 and October 2018 were considered for this retrospective study. Of these, 15 cases and a total of 24 iUS to iUS image pairs met inclusion requirements. Automatic feature detection (Machado et al. in Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg 13(10):1525-1538, 2018) was used to detect and match features in each pair of iUS images. Displacements between matched features were then used to drive both the spline model and the FEM method to compensate for brain shift between image acquisitions. The accuracies of the resultant deformation models were measured by comparing the displacements of manually identified landmarks before and after deformation. RESULTS: The mean initial subcortical registration error between preoperative MRI and the first iUS image averaged 5.3 ± 0.75 mm. The mean subcortical brain shift, measured using displacements between manually identified landmarks in pairs of iUS images, was 2.5 ± 1.3 mm. Our results showed that FEM was able to reduce subcortical registration error by a small but statistically significant amount (from 2.46 to 2.02 mm). A large variability in the results of the spline method prevented us from demonstrating either a statistically significant reduction in subcortical registration error after applying the spline method or a statistically significant difference between the results of the two methods. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we observed less subcortical brain shift than has previously been reported in the literature (Frisken et al., in: Miller (ed) Biomechanics of the brain, Springer, Cham, 2019). This may be due to the fact that we separated out the initial misregistration between preoperative MRI and the first iUS image from our brain shift measurements or it may be due to modern neurosurgical practices designed to reduce brain shift, including reduced craniotomy sizes and better control of intracranial pressure with the use of mannitol and other medications. It appears that the FEM method and its use of geometric and biomechanical constraints provided more consistent brain shift correction and better correction farther from the driving feature displacements than the simple spline model. The spline-based method was simpler and tended to give better results for small deformations. However, large variability in the spline results and relatively small brain shift prevented this study from demonstrating a statistically significant difference between the results of the two methods.
Gao Y, Takagi K, Kato T, Shono N, Hata N. Continuum Robot with Follow the Leader Motion for Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy and Tumor Biopsy. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 2020;67 (2) :379-90.Abstract
[Background] In a combined endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and endoscopic tumor biopsy (ETB) procedure, an optimal tool trajectory is mandatory to minimize trauma to surrounding cerebral tissue. [Objective] This paper presents wire-driven multi-section robot with push-pull driving wire. The robot is tested to attain follow-the-leader (FTL) motion to place surgical instruments through narrow passages while minimizing the trauma to tissues. [Methods] A wire-driven continuum robot with six sub-sections was developed and its kinematic model to achieve FTL motion was proposed. An accuracy test to assess the robot's ability to attain FTL motion along a set of elementary curved trajectory was performed. We also used hydrocephalus ventricular model created from human subject data to generate five ETV/ETB trajectory and conducted a study assessing the accuracy of the FTL motion along these clinically desirable trajectories. [Results] In the test with elementary curved paths, the maximal deviation of the robot was increased from 0.47 mm at 30 degrees turn to 1.78 mm at 180 degrees in a simple C-shaped curve. S-shaped FTL motion had lesser deviation ranging from 0.16 mm to 0.18 mm. In the phantom study, the greatest tip-deviation was 1.45 mm, and the greatest path deviation was 1.23 mm. [Conclusion] We present the application of a continuum robot with FTL motion to perform a combined ETV/ETB procedure. The validation study using human subject data indicated that the accuracy of FTL motion is relatively high. It is expected that may be useful combined ETV and ETB.