Publications

2021
Xu Z, Luo J, Yan J, Li X, Jayender J. F3RNet: Full-resolution Residual Registration Network for Deformable Image Registration. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2021;16 (6) :923-32.Abstract
PURPOSE: Deformable image registration (DIR) is essential for many image-guided therapies. Recently, deep learning approaches have gained substantial popularity and success in DIR. Most deep learning approaches use the so-called mono-stream high-to-low, low-to-high network structure and can achieve satisfactory overall registration results. However, accurate alignments for some severely deformed local regions, which are crucial for pinpointing surgical targets, are often overlooked. Consequently, these approaches are not sensitive to some hard-to-align regions, e.g., intra-patient registration of deformed liver lobes. METHODS: We propose a novel unsupervised registration network, namely full-resolution residual registration network (F3RNet), for deformable registration of severely deformed organs. The proposed method combines two parallel processing streams in a residual learning fashion. One stream takes advantage of the full-resolution information that facilitates accurate voxel-level registration. The other stream learns the deep multi-scale residual representations to obtain robust recognition. We also factorize the 3D convolution to reduce the training parameters and enhance network efficiency. RESULTS: We validate the proposed method on a clinically acquired intra-patient abdominal CT-MRI dataset and a public inspiratory and expiratory thorax CT dataset. Experiments on both multimodal and unimodal registration demonstrate promising results compared to state-of-the-art approaches. CONCLUSION: By combining the high-resolution information and multi-scale representations in a highly interactive residual learning fashion, the proposed F3RNet can achieve accurate overall and local registration. The run time for registering a pair of images is less than 3 s using a GPU. In future works, we will investigate how to cost-effectively process high-resolution information and fuse multi-scale representations.
Moreira P, Grimble J, Iftimia N, Bay CP, Tuncali K, Park J, Tokuda J. In Vivo Evaluation of Angulated Needle-Guide Template for MRI-Guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy. Med Phys. 2021;48 (5) :2553-65.Abstract
PURPOSE: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transperineal prostate biopsy has been practiced since the early 2000s. The technique often suffers from targeting error due to deviation of the needle as a result of physical interaction between the needle and inhomogeneous tissues. Existing needle guide devices, such as a grid template, do not allow choosing an alternative insertion path to mitigate the deviation because of their limited degree-of-freedom (DoF). This study evaluates how an angulated needle insertion path can reduce needle deviation and improve needle placement accuracy. METHODS: We extended a robotic needle-guidance device (Smart Template) for in-bore MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy. The new Smart Template has a 4-DoF needle-guiding mechanism allowing a translational range of motion of 65 and 58 mm along the vertical and horizontal axis, and a needle rotational motion around the vertical and horizontal axis and a vertical rotational range of , respectively. We defined a path planning strategy, which chooses between straight and angulated insertion paths depending on the anatomical structures on the potential insertion path. We performed (a) a set of experiments to evaluate the device positioning accuracy outside the MR-bore, and (b) an in vivo experiment to evaluate the improvement of targeting accuracy combining straight and angulated insertions in animal models (swine, ). RESULTS: We analyzed 46 in vivo insertions using either straight or angulated insertions paths. The experiment showed that the proposed strategy of selecting straight or angulated insertions based on the subject's anatomy outperformed the conventional approach of just straight insertions in terms of targeting accuracy (2.4 mm [1.3-3.7] vs 3.9 mm [2.4-5.0] {Median ); p = 0.041 after the bias correction). CONCLUSION: The in vivo experiment successfully demonstrated that an angulated needle insertion path could improve needle placement accuracy with a path planning strategy that takes account of the subject-specific anatomical structures.
Sedghi A, O'Donnell LJ, Kapur T, Learned-Miller E, Mousavi P, Wells WM. Image Registration: Maximum Likelihood, Minimum Entropy and Deep Learning. Med Image Anal. 2021;69 :101939.Abstract
In this work, we propose a theoretical framework based on maximum profile likelihood for pairwise and groupwise registration. By an asymptotic analysis, we demonstrate that maximum profile likelihood registration minimizes an upper bound on the joint entropy of the distribution that generates the joint image data. Further, we derive the congealing method for groupwise registration by optimizing the profile likelihood in closed form, and using coordinate ascent, or iterative model refinement. We also describe a method for feature based registration in the same framework and demonstrate it on groupwise tractographic registration. In the second part of the article, we propose an approach to deep metric registration that implements maximum likelihood registration using deep discriminative classifiers. We show further that this approach can be used for maximum profile likelihood registration to discharge the need for well-registered training data, using iterative model refinement. We demonstrate that the method succeeds on a challenging registration problem where the standard mutual information approach does not perform well.
Moreira P, Tuncali K, Tempany CM, Tokuda J. The Impact of Placement Errors on the Tumor Coverage in MRI-Guided Focal Cryoablation of Prostate Cancer. Acad Radiol. 2021;28 (6) :841-8.Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: There have been multiple investigations defining and reporting the effectiveness of focal cryoablation as a treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. However, the impact of cryo-needle/probe placement accuracy within the tumor and gland has not been extensively studied. We analyzed how variations in the placement of the cryo-needles, specifically errors leading to incomplete ablation, may affect prostate cancer's resulting cryoablation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a study based on isothermal models using Monte Carlo simulations to analyze the impact of needle placement errors on tumor coverage and the probability of positive ablation margin. We modeled the placement error as a Gaussian noise on the cryo-needle position. The analysis used retrospective MRI data of 15 patients with biopsy-proven, unifocal, and MRI visible prostate cancer to calculate the impact of placement error on the volume of the tumor encompassed by the -40°C and -20°C isotherms using one to four cryo-needles. RESULTS: When the standard deviation of the placement error reached 3 mm, the tumor coverage was still above 97% with the -20°C isotherm, and above 81% with the -40°C isotherm using two cryo-needles or more. The probability of positive margin was significantly lower considering the -20°C isotherm (0.04 for three needles) than using the -40°C isotherm (0.66 for three needles). CONCLUSION: The results indicated that accurate cryo-needle placement is essential for the success of focal cryoablation of prostate cancer. The analysis shows that an admissible targeting error depends on the lethal temperature considered and the number of cryo-needles used.
Nitsch J, Sack J, Halle MW, Moltz JH, Wall A, Rutherford AE, Kikinis R, Meine H. MRI-Based Radiomic Feature Analysis of End-Stage Liver Disease for Severity Stratification. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2021;16 (3) :457-66.Abstract
PURPOSE: We aimed to develop a predictive model of disease severity for cirrhosis using MRI-derived radiomic features of the liver and spleen and compared it to the existing disease severity metrics of MELD score and clinical decompensation. The MELD score is compiled solely by blood parameters, and so far, it was not investigated if extracted image-based features have the potential to reflect severity to potentially complement the calculated score. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of eligible patients with cirrhosis ([Formula: see text]) who underwent a contrast-enhanced MR screening protocol for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening at a tertiary academic center from 2015 to 2018. Radiomic feature analyses were used to train four prediction models for assessing the patient's condition at time of scan: MELD score, MELD score [Formula: see text] 9 (median score of the cohort), MELD score [Formula: see text] 15 (the inflection between the risk and benefit of transplant), and clinical decompensation. Liver and spleen segmentations were used for feature extraction, followed by cross-validated random forest classification. RESULTS: Radiomic features of the liver and spleen were most predictive of clinical decompensation (AUC 0.84), which the MELD score could predict with an AUC of 0.78. Using liver or spleen features alone had slightly lower discrimination ability (AUC of 0.82 for liver and AUC of 0.78 for spleen features only), although this was not statistically significant on our cohort. When radiomic prediction models were trained to predict continuous MELD scores, there was poor correlation. When stratifying risk by splitting our cohort at the median MELD 9 or at MELD 15, our models achieved AUCs of 0.78 or 0.66, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that MRI-based radiomic features of the liver and spleen have the potential to predict the severity of liver cirrhosis, using decompensation or MELD status as imperfect surrogate measures for disease severity.
Tempany-Afdhal CMC. Focal Treatment of Prostate Cancer: MRI Helps Guide the Way Forward. Editorial. Radiology. 2021;298 (3) :704-6.
Noh T, Mustroph M, Golby AJ. Intraoperative Imaging for High-Grade Glioma Surgery. Neurosurg Clin N Am. 2021;32 (1) :47-54.Abstract
This article discusses intraoperative imaging techniques used during high-grade glioma surgery. Gliomas can be difficult to differentiate from surrounding tissue during surgery. Intraoperative imaging helps to alleviate problems encountered during glioma surgery, such as brain shift and residual tumor. There are a variety of modalities available all of which aim to give the surgeon more information, address brain shift, identify residual tumor, and increase the extent of surgical resection. The article starts with a brief introduction followed by a review of with the latest advances in intraoperative ultrasound, intraoperative MRI, and intraoperative computed tomography.
2020
Yoon H, Spinelli JB, Zaganjor E, Wong SJ, German NJ, Randall EC, Dean A, Clermont A, Paulo JA, Garcia D, et al. PHD3 Loss Promotes Exercise Capacity and Fat Oxidation in Skeletal Muscle. Cell Metab. 2020;32 (2) :215-228.e7.Abstract
Rapid alterations in cellular metabolism allow tissues to maintain homeostasis during changes in energy availability. The central metabolic regulator acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) is robustly phosphorylated during cellular energy stress by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to relieve its suppression of fat oxidation. While ACC2 can also be hydroxylated by prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD3), the physiological consequence thereof is poorly understood. We find that ACC2 phosphorylation and hydroxylation occur in an inverse fashion. ACC2 hydroxylation occurs in conditions of high energy and represses fatty acid oxidation. PHD3-null mice demonstrate loss of ACC2 hydroxylation in heart and skeletal muscle and display elevated fatty acid oxidation. Whole body or skeletal muscle-specific PHD3 loss enhances exercise capacity during an endurance exercise challenge. In sum, these data identify an unexpected link between AMPK and PHD3, and a role for PHD3 in acute exercise endurance capacity and skeletal muscle metabolism.
Catalino MP, Yao S, Green DL, Laws ER, Golby AJ, Tie Y. Mapping Cognitive and Emotional Networks in Neurosurgical Patients Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neurosurg Focus. 2020;48 (2) :E9.Abstract
Neurosurgery has been at the forefront of a paradigm shift from a localizationist perspective to a network-based approach to brain mapping. Over the last 2 decades, we have seen dramatic improvements in the way we can image the human brain and noninvasively estimate the location of critical functional networks. In certain patients with brain tumors and epilepsy, intraoperative electrical stimulation has revealed direct links between these networks and their function. The focus of these techniques has rightfully been identification and preservation of so-called "eloquent" brain functions (i.e., motor and language), but there is building momentum for more extensive mapping of cognitive and emotional networks. In addition, there is growing interest in mapping these functions in patients with a broad range of neurosurgical diseases. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that is able to measure spontaneous low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent signal fluctuations at rest to infer neuronal activity. Rs-fMRI may be able to map cognitive and emotional networks for individual patients. In this review, the authors give an overview of the rs-fMRI technique and associated cognitive and emotional resting-state networks, discuss the potential applications of rs-fMRI, and propose future directions for the mapping of cognition and emotion in neurosurgical patients.
Stopa BM, Senders JT, Broekman MLD, Vangel M, Golby AJ. Preoperative Functional MRI Use in Neurooncology Patients: A Clinician Survey. Neurosurg Focus. 2020;48 (2) :E11.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Functional MRI (fMRI) is increasingly being investigated for use in neurosurgical patient care. In the current study, the authors characterize the clinical use of fMRI by surveying neurosurgeons' use of and attitudes toward fMRI as a surgical planning tool in neurooncology patients. METHODS: A survey was developed to inquire about clinicians' use of and experiences with preoperative fMRI in the neurooncology patient population, including example case images. The survey was distributed to all neurosurgical departments with a residency program in the US. RESULTS: After excluding incomplete surveys and responders that do not use fMRI (n = 11), 50 complete responses were included in the final analysis. Responders were predominantly from academic programs (88%), with 20 years or more in practice (40%), with a main area of practice in neurooncology (48%) and treating an adult population (90%). All 50 responders currently use fMRI in neurooncology patients, mostly for low- (94%) and high-grade glioma (82%). The leading decision factors for ordering fMRI were location of mass in dominant hemisphere, location in a functional area, motor symptoms, and aphasia. Across 10 cases, language fMRI yielded the highest interrater reliability agreement (Fleiss' kappa 0.437). The most common reasons for ordering fMRI were to identify language laterality, plan extent of resection, and discuss neurological risks with patients. Clinicians reported that fMRI results were not obtained when ordered a median 10% of the time and were suboptimal a median 27% of the time. Of responders, 70% reported that they had ever resected an fMRI-positive functional site, of whom 77% did so because the site was "cleared" by cortical stimulation. Responders reported disagreement between fMRI and awake surgery 30% of the time. Overall, 98% of responders reported that if results of fMRI and intraoperative mapping disagreed, they would rely on intraoperative mapping. CONCLUSIONS: Although fMRI is increasingly being adopted as a practical preoperative planning tool for brain tumor resection, there remains a substantial degree of discrepancy with regard to its current use and presumed utility. There is a need for further research to evaluate the use of preoperative fMRI in neurooncology patients. As fMRI continues to gain prominence, it will be important for clinicians to collectively share best practices and develop guidelines for the use of fMRI in the preoperative planning phase of brain tumor patients.
Canalini L, Klein J, Miller D, Kikinis R. Enhanced Registration of Ultrasound Volumes by Segmentation of Resection Cavity in Neurosurgical Procedures. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2020;15 (12) :1963-74.Abstract
PURPOSE: Neurosurgeons can have a better understanding of surgical procedures by comparing ultrasound images obtained at different phases of the tumor resection. However, establishing a direct mapping between subsequent acquisitions is challenging due to the anatomical changes happening during surgery. We propose here a method to improve the registration of ultrasound volumes, by excluding the resection cavity from the registration process. METHODS: The first step of our approach includes the automatic segmentation of the resection cavities in ultrasound volumes, acquired during and after resection. We used a convolution neural network inspired by the 3D U-Net. Then, subsequent ultrasound volumes are registered by excluding the contribution of resection cavity. RESULTS: Regarding the segmentation of the resection cavity, the proposed method achieved a mean DICE index of 0.84 on 27 volumes. Concerning the registration of the subsequent ultrasound acquisitions, we reduced the mTRE of the volumes acquired before and during resection from 3.49 to 1.22 mm. For the set of volumes acquired before and after removal, the mTRE improved from 3.55 to 1.21 mm. CONCLUSIONS: We proposed an innovative registration algorithm to compensate the brain shift affecting ultrasound volumes obtained at subsequent phases of neurosurgical procedures. To the best of our knowledge, our method is the first to exclude automatically segmented resection cavities in the registration of ultrasound volumes in neurosurgery.
Lee TC, Guenette JP, Moses ZB, Lee JW, Annino DJ, Chi JH. MRI and CT Guided Cryoablation for Intracranial Extension of Malignancies along the Trigeminal Nerve. J Neurol Surg B Skull Base. 2020;81 (5) :511-4.Abstract
 To describe the technical aspects and early clinical outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided tumor cryoablation along the intracranial trigeminal nerve. This study is a retrospective case review. Large academic tertiary care hospital. Patients who underwent MRI-guided cryoablation of perineural tumor along the intracranial trigeminal nerve. Technical success, pain relief, local control. Percutaneous MRI-guided cryoablation of tumor spread along the intracranial portion of the trigeminal nerve was performed in two patients without complication, with subsequent pain relief, and with local control in the patient with follow-up imaging. Percutaneous MRI-guided cryoablation is a feasible treatment option for malignancies tracking intracranially along the trigeminal nerve.
Narasimhan S, Weis JA, Luo M, Simpson AL, Thompson RC, Miga MI. Accounting for Intraoperative Brain Shift Ascribable to Cavity Collapse During Intracranial Tumor Resection. J Med Imaging (Bellingham). 2020;7 (3) :031506.Abstract
For many patients with intracranial tumors, accurate surgical resection is a mainstay of their treatment paradigm. During surgical resection, image guidance is used to aid in localization and resection. Intraoperative brain shift can invalidate these guidance systems. One cause of intraoperative brain shift is cavity collapse due to tumor resection, which will be referred to as "debulking." We developed an imaging-driven finite element model of debulking to create a comprehensive simulation data set to reflect possible intraoperative changes. The objective was to create a method to account for brain shift due to debulking for applications in image-guided neurosurgery. We hypothesized that accounting for tumor debulking in a deformation atlas data framework would improve brain shift predictions, which would enhance image-based surgical guidance. This was evaluated in a six-patient intracranial tumor resection intraoperative data set. The brain shift deformation atlas data framework consisted of simulated deformations to account for effects due to gravity-induced and hyperosmotic drug-induced brain shift, which reflects previous developments. An additional complement of deformations involving simulated tumor growth followed by debulking was created to capture observed intraoperative effects not previously included. In five of six patient cases evaluated, inclusion of debulking mechanics improved brain shift correction by capturing global mass effects resulting from the resected tumor. These findings suggest imaging-driven brain shift models used to create a deformation simulation data framework of observed intraoperative events can be used to assist in more accurate image-guided surgical navigation in the brain.
Rushmore RJ, Wilson-Braun P, Papadimitriou G, Ng I, Rathi Y, Zhang F, O'Donnell LJ, Kubicki M, Bouix S, Yeterian E, et al. 3D Exploration of the Brainstem in 50-Micron Resolution MRI. Front Neuroanat. 2020;14 :40.Abstract
The brainstem, a structure of vital importance in mammals, is currently becoming a principal focus in cognitive, affective, and clinical neuroscience. Midbrain, pontine and medullary structures serve as the conduit for signals between the forebrain and spinal cord, are the epicenter of cranial nerve-circuits and systems, and subserve such integrative functions as consciousness, emotional processing, pain, and motivation. In this study, we parcellated the nuclear masses and the principal fiber pathways that were visible in a high-resolution T2-weighted MRI dataset of 50-micron isotropic voxels of a postmortem human brainstem. Based on this analysis, we generated a detailed map of the human brainstem. To assess the validity of our maps, we compared our observations with histological maps of traditional human brainstem atlases. Given the unique capability of MRI-based morphometric analysis in generating and preserving the morphology of 3D objects from individual 2D sections, we reconstructed the motor, sensory and integrative neural systems of the brainstem and rendered them in 3D representations. We anticipate the utilization of these maps by the neuroimaging community for applications in basic neuroscience as well as in neurology, psychiatry, and neurosurgery, due to their versatile computational nature in 2D and 3D representations in a publicly available capacity.
Mehrtash A, Wells WM, Tempany CM, Abolmaesumi P, Kapur T. Confidence Calibration and Predictive Uncertainty Estimation for Deep Medical Image Segmentation. IEEE Trans Med Imaging. 2020;39 (12) :3868-78.Abstract
Fully convolutional neural networks (FCNs), and in particular U-Nets, have achieved state-of-the-art results in semantic segmentation for numerous medical imaging applications. Moreover, batch normalization and Dice loss have been used successfully to stabilize and accelerate training. However, these networks are poorly calibrated i.e. they tend to produce overconfident predictions for both correct and erroneous classifications, making them unreliable and hard to interpret. In this paper, we study predictive uncertainty estimation in FCNs for medical image segmentation. We make the following contributions: 1) We systematically compare cross-entropy loss with Dice loss in terms of segmentation quality and uncertainty estimation of FCNs; 2)We propose model ensembling for confidence calibration of the FCNs trained with batch normalization and Dice loss; 3) We assess the ability of calibrated FCNs to predict segmentation quality of structures and detect out-of-distribution test examples. We conduct extensive experiments across three medical image segmentation applications of the brain, the heart, and the prostate to evaluate our contributions. The results of this study offer considerable insight into the predictive uncertainty estimation and out-of-distribution detection in medical image segmentation and provide practical recipes for confidence calibration. Moreover, we consistently demonstrate that model ensembling improves confidence calibration.
Zhang F, Xie G, Leung L, Mooney MA, Epprecht L, Norton I, Rathi Y, Kikinis R, Al-Mefty O, Makris N, et al. Creation of a Novel Trigeminal Tractography Atlas for Automated Trigeminal Nerve Identification. Neuroimage. 2020;220 :117063.Abstract
Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography has been successfully used to study the trigeminal nerves (TGNs) in many clinical and research applications. Currently, identification of the TGN in tractography data requires expert nerve selection using manually drawn regions of interest (ROIs), which is prone to inter-observer variability, time-consuming and carries high clinical and labor costs. To overcome these issues, we propose to create a novel anatomically curated TGN tractography atlas that enables automated identification of the TGN from dMRI tractography. In this paper, we first illustrate the creation of a trigeminal tractography atlas. Leveraging a well-established computational pipeline and expert neuroanatomical knowledge, we generate a data-driven TGN fiber clustering atlas using tractography data from 50 subjects from the Human Connectome Project. Then, we demonstrate the application of the proposed atlas for automated TGN identification in new subjects, without relying on expert ROI placement. Quantitative and visual experiments are performed with comparison to expert TGN identification using dMRI data from two different acquisition sites. We show highly comparable results between the automatically and manually identified TGNs in terms of spatial overlap and visualization, while our proposed method has several advantages. First, our method performs automated TGN identification, and thus it provides an efficient tool to reduce expert labor costs and inter-operator bias relative to expert manual selection. Second, our method is robust to potential imaging artifacts and/or noise that can prevent successful manual ROI placement for TGN selection and hence yields a higher successful TGN identification rate.
Kikinis R, Wells WM. Detection of Brain Metastases with Deep Learning Single-Shot Detector Algorithms. Radiology. 2020;295 (2) :416-7.
Epprecht L, Qureshi A, Kozin ED, Vachicouras N, Huber AM, Kikinis R, Makris N, Brown CM, Reinshagen KL, Lee DJ. Human Cochlear Nucleus on 7 Tesla Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Insights Into Micro-anatomy and Function for Auditory Brainstem Implant Surgery. Otol Neurotol. 2020;41 (4) :e484-e493.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The cochlear nucleus (CN) is the target of the auditory brainstem implant (ABI). Most ABI candidates have Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) and distorted brainstem anatomy from bilateral vestibular schwannomas. The CN is difficult to characterize as routine structural MRI does not resolve detailed anatomy. We hypothesize that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enables both in vivo localization and quantitative measurements of CN morphology. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed 7 Tesla (T) DTI images of 100 subjects (200 CN) and relevant anatomic structures using an MRI brainstem atlas with submillimetric (50 μm) resolution. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Young healthy normal hearing adults. INTERVENTION: Diagnostic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diffusion scalar measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), mode of anisotropy (Mode), principal eigenvectors of the CN, and the adjacent inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP). RESULTS: The CN had a lamellar structure and ventral-dorsal fiber orientation and could be localized lateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP). This fiber orientation was orthogonal to tracts of the adjacent ICP where the fibers run mainly caudal-rostrally. The CN had lower FA compared to the medial aspect of the ICP (0.44 ± 0.09 vs. 0.64 ± 0.08, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: 7T DTI enables characterization of human CN morphology and neuronal substructure. An ABI array insertion vector directed more caudally would better correspond to the main fiber axis of CN. State-of-the-art DTI has implications for ABI preoperative planning and future image guidance-assisted placement of the electrode array.
Steiner A, Alban G, Cheng T, Kapur T, Bay C, McLaughlin P-Y, King M, Tempany C, Lee LJ. Vaginal Recurrence of Endometrial Cancer: MRI Characteristics and Correlation With Patient Outcome After Salvage Radiation Therapy. Abdom Radiol (NY). 2020;45 (4) :1122-31.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate MRI characteristics in vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer (EC) including tumor volume shrinkage during salvage radiotherapy, and to identify imaging features associated with survival. METHODS: Patients with vaginal recurrence of EC treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by brachytherapy (BT), and with available pelvic MRI at two time points: baseline and/or before BT were retrospectively identified from 2004 to 2017. MRI features including recurrence location and tissue characteristics on T2- and T1-weighted images were evaluated at baseline only. Tumor volumes were measured both at baseline and pre-BT. Survival rates and associations were evaluated by Cox regression and Fisher's exact test, respectively. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients with 36 baseline and 50 pre-BT pelvic MRIs were included (24/62 with both MRIs). Vaginal recurrence of EC was most commonly located in the vaginal apex (27/36, 75%). Tumors with a post-contrast enhancing peripheral rim or low T2 signal rim at baseline showed longer recurrence-free survival (RFS) (HR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.9, P < 0.05 adjusted for histology; HR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, P < 0.05, respectively). The median tumor shrinkage at pre-BT was 69% (range 1-99%). Neither absolute tumor volumes nor volume regression at pre-BT were associated with RFS. Lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) at hysterectomy and adjuvant RT were associated with recurrence involving the distal vagina (both P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Vaginal recurrences with rim enhancement at baseline MRI predicted improved RFS, while tumor volume shrinkage at pre-BT did not. Distal vaginal recurrence was more common in patients with LVSI and adjuvant RT at EC diagnosis.
Miskin N, Unadkat P, Carlton ME, Golby AJ, Young GS, Huang RY. Frequency and Evolution of New Postoperative Enhancement on 3 Tesla Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neurosurgery. 2020;87 (2) :238-46.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IO-MRI) provides real-time assessment of extent of resection of brain tumor. Development of new enhancement during IO-MRI can confound interpretation of residual enhancing tumor, although the incidence of this finding is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of new enhancement during brain tumor resection on intraoperative 3 Tesla (3T) MRI. To optimize the postoperative imaging window after brain tumor resection using 1.5 and 3T MRI. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 64 IO-MRI performed for patients with enhancing brain lesions referred for biopsy or resection as well as a subset with an early postoperative MRI (EP-MRI) within 72 h of surgery (N = 42), and a subset with a late postoperative MRI (LP-MRI) performed between 120 h and 8 wk postsurgery (N = 34). Three radiologists assessed for new enhancement on IO-MRI, and change in enhancement on available EP-MRI and LP-MRI. Consensus was determined by majority response. Inter-rater agreement was assessed using percentage agreement. RESULTS: A total of 10 out of 64 (16%) of the IO-MRI demonstrated new enhancement. Seven of 10 patients with available EP-MRI demonstrated decreased/resolved enhancement. One out of 42 (2%) of the EP-MRI demonstrated new enhancement, which decreased on LP-MRI. Agreement was 74% for the assessment of new enhancement on IO-MRI and 81% for the assessment of new enhancement on the EP-MRI. CONCLUSION: New enhancement occurs in intraoperative 3T MRI in 16% of patients after brain tumor resection, which decreases or resolves on subsequent MRI within 72 h of surgery. Our findings indicate the opportunity for further study to optimize the postoperative imaging window.

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