Publications

2017
Alison M Pouch, Ahmed H Aly, Andras Lasso, Alexander V Nguyen, Adam B Scanlan, Francis X McGowan, Gabor Fichtinger, Robert C Gorman, Joseph H Gorman, Paul A Yushkevich, and Matthew A Jolley. 2017. “Image Segmentation and Modeling of the Pediatric Tricuspid Valve in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.” Funct Imaging Model Heart, 10263, Pp. 95-105.Abstract
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a single-ventricle congenital heart disease that is fatal if left unpalliated. In HLHS patients, the tricuspid valve is the only functioning atrioventricular valve, and its competence is therefore critical. This work demonstrates the first automated strategy for segmentation, modeling, and morphometry of the tricuspid valve in transthoracic 3D echocardiographic (3DE) images of pediatric patients with HLHS. After initial landmark placement, the automated segmentation step uses multi-atlas label fusion and the modeling approach uses deformable modeling with medial axis representation to produce patient-specific models of the tricuspid valve that can be comprehensively and quantitatively assessed. In a group of 16 pediatric patients, valve segmentation and modeling attains an accuracy (mean boundary displacement) of 0.8 ± 0.2 mm relative to manual tracing and shows consistency in annular and leaflet measurements. In the future, such image-based tools have the potential to improve understanding and evaluation of tricuspid valve morphology in HLHS and guide strategies for patient care.
Sonia Pujol, Ryan Cabeen, Sophie B Sébille, Jérôme Yelnik, Chantal François, Sara Fernandez Vidal, Carine Karachi, Yulong Zhao, Rees G Cosgrove, Pierre Jannin, Ron Kikinis, and Eric Bardinet. 2017. “In vivo Exploration of the Connectivity between the Subthalamic Nucleus and the Globus Pallidus in the Human Brain using Multi-Fiber Tractography.” Front Neuroanat, 10, Pp. 119.Abstract

The basal ganglia is part of a complex system of neuronal circuits that play a key role in the integration and execution of motor, cognitive and emotional function in the human brain. Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological disorder of the motor circuit characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movement. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus pars interna provides an efficient treatment to reduce symptoms and levodopa-induced side effects in Parkinson's disease patients. While the underlying mechanism of action of DBS is still unknown, the potential modulation of white matter tracts connecting the surgical targets has become an active area of research. With the introduction of advanced diffusion MRI acquisition sequences and sophisticated post-processing techniques, the architecture of the human brain white matter can be explored in vivo. The goal of this study is to investigate the white matter connectivity between the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus. Two multi-fiber tractography methods were used to reconstruct pallido-subthalamic, subthalamo-pallidal and pyramidal fibers in five healthy subjects datasets of the Human Connectome Project. The anatomical accuracy of the tracts was assessed by four judges with expertise in neuroanatomy, functional neurosurgery, and diffusion MRI. The variability among subjects was evaluated based on the fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of the tracts. Both multi-fiber approaches enabled the detection of complex fiber architecture in the basal ganglia. The qualitative evaluation by experts showed that the identified tracts were in agreement with the expected anatomy. Tract-derived measurements demonstrated relatively low variability among subjects. False-negative tracts demonstrated the current limitations of both methods for clinical decision-making. Multi-fiber tractography methods combined with state-of-the-art diffusion MRI data have the potential to help identify white matter tracts connecting DBS targets in functional neurosurgery intervention.

Marc Herrlich, Parnian Tavakol, David Black, Dirk Wenig, Christian Rieder, Rainer Malaka, and Ron Kikinis. 2017. “Instrument-mounted Displays for Reducing Cognitive Load During Surgical Navigation.” Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg, 12, 9, Pp. 1599-1605.Abstract
PURPOSE: Surgical navigation systems rely on a monitor placed in the operating room to relay information. Optimal monitor placement can be challenging in crowded rooms, and it is often not possible to place the monitor directly beside the situs. The operator must split attention between the navigation system and the situs. We present an approach for needle-based interventions to provide navigational feedback directly on the instrument and close to the situs by mounting a small display onto the needle. METHODS: By mounting a small and lightweight smartwatch display directly onto the instrument, we are able to provide navigational guidance close to the situs and directly in the operator's field of view, thereby reducing the need to switch the focus of view between the situs and the navigation system. We devise a specific variant of the established crosshair metaphor suitable for the very limited screen space. We conduct an empirical user study comparing our approach to using a monitor and a combination of both. RESULTS: Results from the empirical user study show significant benefits for cognitive load, user preference, and general usability for the instrument-mounted display, while achieving the same level of performance in terms of time and accuracy compared to using a monitor. CONCLUSION: We successfully demonstrate the feasibility of our approach and potential benefits. With ongoing technological advancements, instrument-mounted displays might complement standard monitor setups for surgical navigation in order to lower cognitive demands and for improved usability of such systems.
Daniel I Glazer, William W Mayo-Smith, Nisha I Sainani, Cheryl A Sadow, Mark G Vangel, Clare M Tempany, and Ruth M Dunne. 2017. “Interreader Agreement of Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 Using an In-Bore MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Cohort: A Single Institution's Initial Experience.” AJR Am J Roentgenol, 209, 3, Pp. W145-51.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to determine the interobserver agreement of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System version 2 (PI-RADSv2) for diagnosing prostate cancer using in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-nine patients underwent in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy between January 21, 2010, and August 21, 2013, and underwent diagnostic multiparametric MRI 6 months or less before biopsy. A single index lesion per patient was selected after retrospective review of MR images. Three fellowship-trained abdominal radiologists (with 1-11 years' experience) blinded to clinical information interpreted all studies according to PI-RADSv2. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Cohen kappa statistics. RESULTS: Thirty-eight lesions were in the peripheral zone and 21 were in the transition zone. Cancer was diagnosed in 26 patients (44%). Overall PI-RADS scores were higher for all biopsy-positive lesions (mean ± SD, 3.9 ± 1.1) than for biopsy-negative lesions (3.1 ± 1.0; p < 0.0001) and for clinically significant lesions (4.2 ± 1.0) than for clinically insignificant lesions (3.1 ± 1.0; p < 0.0001). Overall suspicion score interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.45). There was moderate interobserver agreement among overall PI-RADS scores in the peripheral zone (κ = 0.46) and fair agreement in the transition zone (κ = 0.36). CONCLUSION: PI-RADSv2 scores were higher in the biopsy-positive group. PI-RADSv2 showed moderate interobserver agreement among abdominal radiologists with no prior experience using the scoring system.
Sophia C Kamran, Matthias M Manuel, Paul Catalano, Linda Cho, Antonio L Damato, Larissa J Lee, Ehud J Schmidt, and Akila N Viswanathan. 2017. “MR- versus CT-based High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Vaginal Recurrence of Endometrial Cancer.” Brachytherapy, 16, 6, Pp. 1159-68.Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare clinical outcomes of MR-based versus CT-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for vaginal recurrence of endometrioid endometrial cancer (EC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We reviewed 66 patients with vaginal recurrent EC; 18 had MR-based ISBT on a prospective clinical trial and 48 had CT-based treatment. Kaplan-Meier survival modeling was used to generate estimates for local control (LC), disease-free interval (DFI), and overall survival (OS), and multivariate Cox modeling was used to assess prognostic factors. Toxicities were evaluated and compared. RESULTS: Median followup was 33 months (CT 30 months, MR 35 months). Median cumulative equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions was 75.5 Gy for MR-ISBT and 73.8 Gy for CT-ISBT (p = 0.58). MR patients were older (p = 0.03) and had larger tumor size (>4 cm vs. ≤ 4 cm) compared to CT patients (p = 0.04). For MR-based versus CT-based ISBT, 3-year KM rate for local control was 100% versus 78% (p = 0.04), DFI was 69% versus 55% (p = 0.1), and OS was 63% versus 75% (p = 0.81), respectively. On multivariate analysis, tumor Grade 3 was associated with worse OS (HR 3.57, 95% CI 1.25, 11.36) in a model with MR-ISBT (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.16, 1.89). Toxicities were not significantly different between the two modalities. CONCLUSION: Despite worse patient prognostic features, MR-ISBT was associated with a significantly better (100%) 3-year local control, comparable survival, and improved DFI rates compared to CT. Toxicities did not differ compared to CT-ISBT patients. Tumor grade contributed as the most significant predictor for survival. Larger prospective studies are needed to assess the impact of MR-ISBT on survival outcomes.
Andriy Fedorov, Mark G Vangel, Clare M Tempany, and Fiona M Fennessy. 2017. “Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate: Repeatability of Volume and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Quantification.” Invest Radiol, 52, 9, Pp. 538-46.Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of a region of interest (ROI) volume and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in standard-of-care 3 T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate obtained with the use of endorectal coil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, with institutional review board approval and written informed consent. Men with confirmed or suspected treatment-naive prostate cancer scheduled for mpMRI were offered a repeat mpMRI within 2 weeks. Regions of interest corresponding to the whole prostate gland, the entire peripheral zone (PZ), normal PZ, and suspected tumor ROI (tROI) on axial T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced subtract, and ADC images were annotated and assessed using Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) v2. Repeatability of the ROI volume for each of the analyzed image types and mean ROI ADC was summarized with repeatability coefficient (RC) and RC%. RESULTS: A total of 189 subjects were approached to participate in the study. Of 40 patients that gave initial agreement, 15 men underwent 2 mpMRI examinations and completed the study. Peripheral zone tROIs were identified in 11 subjects. Tumor ROI volume was less than 0.5 mL in 8 of 11 subjects. PI-RADS categories were identical between baseline-repeat studies in 11/15 subjects and differed by 1 point in 4/15. Peripheral zone tROI volume RC (RC%) was 233 mm (71%) on axial T2-weighted, 422 mm (112%) on ADC, and 488 mm (119%) on dynamic contrast-enhanced subtract. Apparent diffusion coefficient ROI mean RC (RC%) were 447 × 10 mm/s (42%) in PZ tROI and 471 × 10 mm/s (30%) in normal PZ. Significant difference in repeatability of the tROI volume across series was observed (P < 0.005). The mean ADC RC% was lower than volume RC% for tROI ADC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: PI-RADS v2 overall assessment was highly repeatable. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging sequences differ in volume measurement repeatability. The mean tROI ADC is more repeatable compared with tROI volume in ADC. Repeatability of prostate ADC is comparable with that in other abdominal organs.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
Michael Halle, Valentin Demeusy, and Ron Kikinis. 2017. “The Open Anatomy Browser: A Collaborative Web-Based Viewer for Interoperable Anatomy Atlases.” Front Neuroinform, 11, Pp. 22.Abstract
The Open Anatomy Browser (OABrowser) is an open source, web-based, zero-installation anatomy atlas viewer based on current web browser technologies and evolving anatomy atlas interoperability standards. OABrowser displays three-dimensional anatomical models, image cross-sections of labeled structures and source radiological imaging, and a text-based hierarchy of structures. The viewer includes novel collaborative tools: users can save bookmarks of atlas views for later access and exchange those bookmarks with other users, and dynamic shared views allow groups of users can participate in a collaborative interactive atlas viewing session. We have published several anatomy atlases (an MRI-derived brain atlas and atlases of other parts of the anatomy) to demonstrate OABrowser's functionality. The atlas source data, processing tools, and the source for OABrowser are freely available through GitHub and are distributed under a liberal open source license.
Erik Velez, Andriy Fedorov, Kemal Tuncali, Olutayo Olubiyi, Christopher B Allard, Adam S Kibel, and Clare M Tempany. 2017. “Pathologic Correlation of Transperineal In-Bore 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy Samples with Radical Prostatectomy Specimen.” Abdom Radiol (NY), 42, 8, Pp. 2154-9.Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the accuracy of in-bore transperineal 3-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided prostate biopsies for predicting final Gleason grades in patients who subsequently underwent radical prostatectomy (RP). METHODS: A retrospective review of men who underwent transperineal MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy (tpMRGB) with subsequent radical prostatectomy within 1 year was conducted from 2010 to 2015. All patients underwent a baseline 3-T multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with endorectal coil and were selected for biopsy based on MR findings of a suspicious prostate lesion and high degree of clinical suspicion for cancer. Spearman correlation was performed to assess concordance between tpMRGB and final RP pathology among patients with and without previous transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies. RESULTS: A total of 24 men met all eligibility requirements, with a median age of 65 years (interquartile range [IQR] 11.7). The median time from biopsy to RP was 85 days (IQR 50.5). Final pathology revealed Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 in 12 patients, 4 + 3 = 7 in 10 patients, and 4 + 4 = 8 in 2 patients. A strong correlation (ρ: +0.75, p < 0.001) between tpMRGB and RP results was observed, with Gleason scores concordant in 17 cases (71%). 16 of the 24 patients underwent prior TRUS biopsies. Subsequent tpMRGB revealed Gleason upgrading in 88% of cases, which was concordant with RP Gleason scores in 69% of cases (ρ: +0.75, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Final Gleason scores diagnosed by tpMRGB at 3-T correlate strongly with final RP surgical pathology. This may facilitate prostate cancer diagnosis, particularly in patients with negative or low-grade TRUS biopsy results in whom clinically significant cancer is suspected or detected on mpMRI.

Jeffrey P Guenette, Kemal Tuncali, Nathan Himes, Paul B Shyn, and Thomas C Lee. 2017. “Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation of Head and Neck Tumors for Local Control, Preservation of Functional Status, and Pain Relief.” AJR Am J Roentgenol, 208, 2, Pp. 453-8.Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We report nine consecutive percutaneous image-guided cryoablation procedures of head and neck tumors in seven patients (four men and three women; mean age, 68 years; age range, 50-78 years). Ablation of the entire tumor for local control or ablation of a region of tumor for pain relief or preservation of function was achieved in eight of nine procedures. One patient experienced intraprocedural bradycardia, and another developed a neopharyngeal abscess. There were no deaths, permanent neurologic or functional deficits, vascular complications, or adverse cosmetic sequelae due to the procedures. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous image-guided cryoablation offers a potentially less morbid minimally invasive treatment option than salvage head and neck surgery. The complications that we encountered may be avoidable with increased experience. Further work is needed to continue improving the safety and efficacy of cryoablation of head and neck tumors and to continue expanding the use of cryoablation in patients with head and neck tumors that cannot be treated surgically.

Daniel I Glazer, Servet Tatli, Paul B Shyn, Mark G Vangel, Kemal Tuncali, and Stuart G Silverman. 2017. “Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation of Hepatic Tumors: Single-Center Experience with Intermediate to Long-Term Outcomes.” AJR Am J Roentgenol, 209, 6, Pp. 1381-9.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to report our intermediate to long-term outcomes with image-guided percutaneous hepatic tumor cryoablation and to evaluate its technical success, technique efficacy, local tumor progression, and adverse event rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1998 and 2014, 299 hepatic tumors (243 metastases and 56 primary tumors; mean diameter, 2.5 cm; median diameter, 2.2 cm; range, 0.3-7.8 cm) in 186 patients (95 women; mean age, 60.9 years; range, 29-88 years) underwent cryoablation during 236 procedures using CT (n = 126), MRI (n = 100), or PET/CT (n = 10) guidance. Technical success, technique efficacy at 3 months, local tumor progression (mean follow-up, 2.5 years; range, 2 months to 14.6 years), and adverse event rates were calculated. RESULTS: The technical success rate was 94.6% (279/295). The technique efficacy rate was 89.5% (231/258) and was greater for tumors smaller than 4 cm (93.4%; 213/228) than for larger tumors (60.0%; 18/30) (p < 0.0001). Local tumor progression occurred in 23.3% (60/258) of tumors and was significantly more common after the treatment of tumors 4 cm or larger (63.3%; 19/30) compared with smaller tumors (18.0%; 41/228) (p < 0.0001). Adverse events followed 33.8% (80/236) of procedures and were grade 3-5 in 10.6% (25/236) of cases. Grade 3 or greater adverse events more commonly followed the treatment of larger tumors (19.5%; 8/41) compared with smaller tumors (8.7%; 17/195) (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of hepatic tumors is efficacious; however, tumors smaller than 4 cm are more likely to be treated successfully and without an adverse event.
Ruizhi Liao, Lipeng Ning, Zhenrui Chen, Laura Rigolo, Shun Gong, Ofer Pasternak, Alexandra J Golby, Yogesh Rathi, Lauren J O'Donnell, and JV ckovic. 2017. “Performance of Unscented Kalman Filter Tractography in Edema: Analysis of the Two-tensor Model.” Neuroimage Clin, 15, Pp. 819-31.Abstract
Diffusion MRI tractography is increasingly used in pre-operative neurosurgical planning to visualize critical fiber tracts. However, a major challenge for conventional tractography, especially in patients with brain tumors, is tracing fiber tracts that are affected by vasogenic edema, which increases water content in the tissue and lowers diffusion anisotropy. One strategy for improving fiber tracking is to use a tractography method that is more sensitive than the traditional single-tensor streamline tractography. We performed experiments to assess the performance of two-tensor unscented Kalman filter (UKF) tractography in edema. UKF tractography fits a diffusion model to the data during fiber tracking, taking advantage of prior information from the previous step along the fiber. We studied UKF performance in a synthetic diffusion MRI digital phantom with simulated edema and in retrospective data from two neurosurgical patients with edema affecting the arcuate fasciculus and corticospinal tracts. We compared the performance of several tractography methods including traditional streamline, UKF single-tensor, and UKF two-tensor. To provide practical guidance on how the UKF method could be employed, we evaluated the impact of using various seed regions both inside and outside the edematous regions, as well as the impact of parameter settings on the tractography sensitivity. We quantified the sensitivity of different methods by measuring the percentage of the patient-specific fMRI activation that was reached by the tractography. We expected that diffusion anisotropy threshold parameters, as well as the inclusion of a free water model, would significantly influence the reconstruction of edematous WM fiber tracts, because edema increases water content in the tissue and lowers anisotropy. Contrary to our initial expectations, varying the fractional anisotropy threshold and including a free water model did not affect the UKF two-tensor tractography output appreciably in these two patient datasets. The most effective parameter for increasing tracking sensitivity was the generalized anisotropy (GA) threshold, which increased the length of tracked fibers when reduced to 0.075. In addition, the most effective seeding strategy was seeding in the whole brain or in a large region outside of the edema. Overall, the main contribution of this study is to provide insight into how UKF tractography can work, using a two-tensor model, to begin to address the challenge of fiber tract reconstruction in edematous regions near brain tumors.
Miaomiao Zhang, William M Wells, and Polina Golland. 2017. “Probabilistic Modeling of Anatomical Variability using a Low Dimensional Parameterization of Diffeomorphisms.” Med Image Anal, 41, Pp. 55-62.Abstract
We present an efficient probabilistic model of anatomical variability in a linear space of initial velocities of diffeomorphic transformations and demonstrate its benefits in clinical studies of brain anatomy. To overcome the computational challenges of the high dimensional deformation-based descriptors, we develop a latent variable model for principal geodesic analysis (PGA) based on a low dimensional shape descriptor that effectively captures the intrinsic variability in a population. We define a novel shape prior that explicitly represents principal modes as a multivariate complex Gaussian distribution on the initial velocities in a bandlimited space. We demonstrate the performance of our model on a set of 3D brain MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. Our model yields a more compact representation of group variation at substantially lower computational cost than the state-of-the-art method such as tangent space PCA (TPCA) and probabilistic principal geodesic analysis (PPGA) that operate in the high dimensional image space.
Tina Kapur and Clare M. Tempany. 2017. “Proceedings of the 9th Image Guided Therapy Workshop” 9, Pp. 1-54. 2017 IGT Workshop Proceedings
Jose de Arcos, Ehud J Schmidt, Wei Wang, Junichi Tokuda, Kamal Vij, Ravi T Seethamraju, Antonio L Damato, Charles L Dumoulin, Robert A Cormack, and Akila N Viswanathan. 2017. “Prospective Clinical Implementation of a Novel Magnetic Resonance Tracking Device for Real-Time Brachytherapy Catheter Positioning.” Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 99, 3, Pp. 618-26.Abstract
PURPOSE: We designed and built dedicated active magnetic resonance (MR)-tracked (MRTR) stylets. We explored the role of MRTR in a prospective clinical trial. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eleven gynecologic cancer patients underwent MRTR to rapidly optimize interstitial catheter placement. MRTR catheter tip location and orientation were computed and overlaid on images displayed on in-room monitors at rates of 6 to 16 frames per second. Three modes of actively tracked navigation were analyzed: coarse navigation to the approximate region around the tumor; fine-tuning, bringing the stylets to the desired location; and pullback, with MRTR stylets rapidly withdrawn from within the catheters, providing catheter trajectories for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Catheters with conventional stylets were inserted, forming baseline locations. MRTR stylets were substituted, and catheter navigation was performed by a clinician working inside the MRI bore, using monitor feedback. RESULTS: Coarse navigation allowed repositioning of the MRTR catheters tips by 16 mm (mean), relative to baseline, in 14 ± 5 s/catheter (mean ± standard deviation [SD]). The fine-tuning mode repositioned the catheter tips by a further 12 mm, in 24 ± 17 s/catheter. Pullback mode provided catheter trajectories with RTP point resolution of ∼1.5 mm, in 1 to 9 s/catheter. CONCLUSIONS: MRTR-based navigation resulted in rapid and optimal placement of interstitial brachytherapy catheters. Catheters were repositioned compared with the initial insertion without tracking. In pullback mode, catheter trajectories matched computed tomographic precision, enabling their use for RTP.
Elmira Hassanzadeh, Daniel I Glazer, Ruth M Dunne, Fiona M Fennessy, Mukesh G Harisinghani, and Clare M Tempany. 2017. “Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS v2): A Pictorial Review.” Abdom Radiol (NY), 42, 1, Pp. 278-89.Abstract

The most recent edition of the prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS version 2) was developed based on expert consensus of the international working group on prostate cancer. It provides the minimum acceptable technical standards for MR image acquisition and suggests a structured method for multiparametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) reporting. T1-weighted, T2-weighted (T2W), diffusion-weighted (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging are the suggested sequences to include in mpMRI. The PI-RADS version 2 scoring system enables the reader to assess and rate all focal lesions detected at mpMRI to determine the likelihood of a clinically significant cancer. According to PI-RADS v2, a lesion with a Gleason score ≥7, volume >0.5 cc, or extraprostatic extension is considered clinically significant. PI-RADS v2 uses the concept of a dominant MR sequence based on zonal location of the lesion rather than summing each component score, as was the case in version 1. The dominant sequence in the peripheral zone is DWI and the corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, with a secondary role for DCE in equivocal cases (PI-RADS score 3). For lesions in the transition zone, T2W images are the dominant sequence with DWI/ADC images playing a supporting role in the case of an equivocal lesion.

Chantal MW Tax, Carl-Fredrik Westin, Tom Dela Haije, Andrea Fuster, Max A Viergever, Evan Calabrese, Luc Florack, and Alexander Leemans. 2017. “Quantifying the Brain's Sheet Structure with Normalized Convolution.” Med Image Anal, 39, Pp. 162-77.Abstract
The hypothesis that brain pathways form 2D sheet-like structures layered in 3D as "pages of a book" has been a topic of debate in the recent literature. This hypothesis was mainly supported by a qualitative evaluation of "path neighborhoods" reconstructed with diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography. Notwithstanding the potentially important implications of the sheet structure hypothesis for our understanding of brain structure and development, it is still considered controversial by many for lack of quantitative analysis. A means to quantify sheet structure is therefore necessary to reliably investigate its occurrence in the brain. Previous work has proposed the Lie bracket as a quantitative indicator of sheet structure, which could be computed by reconstructing path neighborhoods from the peak orientations of dMRI orientation density functions. Robust estimation of the Lie bracket, however, is challenging due to high noise levels and missing peak orientations. We propose a novel method to estimate the Lie bracket that does not involve the reconstruction of path neighborhoods with tractography. This method requires the computation of derivatives of the fiber peak orientations, for which we adopt an approach called normalized convolution. With simulations and experimental data we show that the new approach is more robust with respect to missing peaks and noise. We also demonstrate that the method is able to quantify to what extent sheet structure is supported for dMRI data of different species, acquired with different scanners, diffusion weightings, dMRI sampling schemes, and spatial resolutions. The proposed method can also be used with directional data derived from other techniques than dMRI, which will facilitate further validation of the existence of sheet structure.
KT Huang, S Ludy, D Calligaris, IF Dunn, E Laws, S Santagata, and NYR Agar. 2017. “Rapid Mass Spectrometry Imaging to Assess the Biochemical Profile of Pituitary Tissue for Potential Intraoperative Usage.” Adv Cancer Res, 134, Pp. 257-82.Abstract

Pituitary adenomas are relatively common intracranial neoplasms that are frequently treated with surgical resection. Rapid visualization of pituitary tissue remains a challenge as current techniques either produce little to no information on hormone-secreting function or are too slow to practically aid in intraoperative or even perioperative decision-making. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) represents a powerful method by which molecular maps of tissue samples can be created, yielding a two-dimensional representation of the expression patterns of small molecules and proteins from biologic samples. In this chapter, we review the use of MALDI MSI, its application to the characterization of the pituitary gland, and its potential applications for guiding the management of pituitary adenomas.

Ma Luo, Sarah F Frisken, Jared A Weis, Logan W Clements, Prashin Unadkat, Reid C Thompson, Alexandra J Golby, and Michael I Miga. 2017. “Retrospective Study Comparing Model-Based Deformation Correction to Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Image-Guided Neurosurgery.” J Med Imaging (Bellingham), 4, 3, Pp. 035003.Abstract
Brain shift during tumor resection compromises the spatial validity of registered preoperative imaging data that is critical to image-guided procedures. One current clinical solution to mitigate the effects is to reimage using intraoperative magnetic resonance (iMR) imaging. Although iMR has demonstrated benefits in accounting for preoperative-to-intraoperative tissue changes, its cost and encumbrance have limited its widespread adoption. While iMR will likely continue to be employed for challenging cases, a cost-effective model-based brain shift compensation strategy is desirable as a complementary technology for standard resections. We performed a retrospective study of [Formula: see text] tumor resection cases, comparing iMR measurements with intraoperative brain shift compensation predicted by our model-based strategy, driven by sparse intraoperative cortical surface data. For quantitative assessment, homologous subsurface targets near the tumors were selected on preoperative MR and iMR images. Once rigidly registered, intraoperative shift measurements were determined and subsequently compared to model-predicted counterparts as estimated by the brain shift correction framework. When considering moderate and high shift ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] measurements per case), the alignment error due to brain shift reduced from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text], representing [Formula: see text] correction. These first steps toward validation are promising for model-based strategies.
Mukund Balasubramanian, William M Wells, John R Ives, Patrick Britz, Robert V Mulkern, and Darren B Orbach. 2017. “RF Heating of Gold Cup and Conductive Plastic Electrodes during Simultaneous EEG and MRI.” Neurodiagn J, 57, 1, Pp. 69-83.Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the heating of EEG electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms with a focus on the antenna effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Gold cup and conductive plastic electrodes were placed on small watermelons with fiberoptic probes used to measure electrode temperature changes during a variety of 1.5T and 3T MRI scans. A subset of these experiments was repeated on a healthy human volunteer. RESULTS: The differences between gold and plastic electrodes did not appear to be practically significant. For both electrode types, we observed heating below 4°C for straight wires whose lengths were multiples of ½ the radiofrequency (RF) wavelength and stronger heating (over 15°C) for wire lengths that were odd multiples of ¼ RF wavelength, consistent with the antenna effect. CONCLUSIONS: The antenna effect, which has received little attention so far in the context of EEG-MRI safety, can play as significant a role as the loop effect (from electromagnetic induction) in the heating of EEG electrodes, and therefore wire lengths that are odd multiples of ¼ RF wavelength should be avoided. These results have important implications for the design of EEG electrodes and MRI studies as they help to minimize the risk to patients undergoing MRI with EEG electrodes in place.
Tobias Frank, Axel Krieger, Simon Leonard, Niravkumar A Patel, and Junichi Tokuda. 2017. “ROS-IGTL-Bridge: An Open Network Interface for Image-Guided Therapy using the ROS Environment.” Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg, 12, 8, Pp. 1451-60.Abstract
PURPOSE: With the growing interest in advanced image-guidance for surgical robot systems, rapid integration and testing of robotic devices and medical image computing software are becoming essential in the research and development. Maximizing the use of existing engineering resources built on widely accepted platforms in different fields, such as robot operating system (ROS) in robotics and 3D Slicer in medical image computing could simplify these tasks. We propose a new open network bridge interface integrated in ROS to ensure seamless cross-platform data sharing. METHODS: A ROS node named ROS-IGTL-Bridge was implemented. It establishes a TCP/IP network connection between the ROS environment and external medical image computing software using the OpenIGTLink protocol. The node exports ROS messages to the external software over the network and vice versa simultaneously, allowing seamless and transparent data sharing between the ROS-based devices and the medical image computing platforms. RESULTS: Performance tests demonstrated that the bridge could stream transforms, strings, points, and images at 30 fps in both directions successfully. The data transfer latency was <1.2 ms for transforms, strings and points, and 25.2 ms for color VGA images. A separate test also demonstrated that the bridge could achieve 900 fps for transforms. Additionally, the bridge was demonstrated in two representative systems: a mock image-guided surgical robot setup consisting of 3D slicer, and Lego Mindstorms with ROS as a prototyping and educational platform for IGT research; and the smart tissue autonomous robot surgical setup with 3D Slicer. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that the bridge enabled cross-platform data sharing between ROS and medical image computing software. This will allow rapid and seamless integration of advanced image-based planning/navigation offered by the medical image computing software such as 3D Slicer into ROS-based surgical robot systems.

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